Not All Hospitals Equipped to Treat Ebola

 

By Mary Kuhlman

Ebola has become a top health concern in the U.S. with the diagnosis of a second health care worker in Texas.

Purdue University researcher David Sanders is an expert on the virus and he says regional medical facilities need to be set up in the U.S. to treat potential Ebola patients, because not all hospitals have the specialized training needed to contain the virus.

"I do not think that without rigorous training, they are capable of doing all the containment procedures," he says. "And so we should focus that training on a smaller number of hospitals and that's where Ebola patients should be."

The newly diagnosed patient was transferred to an Atlanta hospital, which has successfully treated two others who contracted the disease in West Africa.

Sanders stresses that patients need to share their travel history whenever they meet with a medical provider.

He says it is critical information to prevent the spread of any disease, not just Ebola.

"If you go to South America or East Asia there is a different ensemble of possible diseases associated with a set of symptoms, and the physician won't necessarily think about them if he isn't aware of where you've been travelling recently," he explains.

According to a Washington Post-ABC News poll, nearly two-thirds of Americans are concerned about a widespread Ebola epidemic.

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