Indy's Central Library was invaded by sasquatch on Thursday, Sept. 30 - or at least by drawings of what enthusiasts and their kids think sasquatch looks like. Spurred on by Big Car Art Gallery's Jim Walker, the drawings were created in anticipation of that night's lecture by Jeffrey Meldrum, a professor from Idaho State University and researcher on the legend of Bigfoot.

"From my perspective ... based on the evidence that I have first hand, there is an extremely large probability that there is a biological species behind the legend of sasquatch," said Meldrum, who has an academic background in primate and human locomotion.

Meldrum's lab holds over 200 caster molds of sasquatch footprints found in the U.S. and Canada. He and his colleagues are currently working on a 3D database of the caster molds.

In front of a crowd of about 150, Meldrum separated fact from fiction. He defended the authenticity of his molds with a detailed description of the evolution of bipedal locomotion. After the lecture, which ran 30 minutes late, many stayed to get signed copies of Meldrum's book, Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science.

A Big Car event is set for Oct. 2. The event will consist of about 500 Bigfoot illustrations done by attendants at events like Penrod and Oranje. There will also be a sculpture of Bigfoot and a Bigfoot habitat. Next door, iMOCA will be sponsoring Bigfoot related art by Matt Russell and Matta Kalasky.

According to Meldrum, artists and Bigfoot go way back. The professor showed cave drawings that predate European contact with Native Americans, and examples of modern works.

"Art and science obviously can have a very collaborative relationship. Artists can depict what eyewitnesses claim to see. They can help us depict and share that experience," said Meldrum.

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