Compiled by DRH and PFPP

ï Playing catch-up. According to the Brookings Institute, 83 percent of the 51 largest metro areas in the U.S. say biotechnology is one of their top two priorities for economic development. The leading biotech cities are currently: Boston, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Raleigh-Durham, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C. Eli Lilly and Co., the eighth largest pharmaceutical firm in the county, is Indy"s biggest biotech player. New York City is home to seven of the top 10 pharmas; Miami and Chicago also have one apiece. In 2000, the National Institutes of Health sent $82.2 million to Indianapolis; Boston got $1.42 billion. Between 1995 and 2000, there were two venture capital investments in biotech here amounting to $15.5 million; San Francisco had 261 totaling $3.03 billion. ï The war on terror may continue, but that doesn"t mean Indianapolis can"t afford to continue its seatbelt enforcement zones. If you"re caught not wearing a seatbelt in one of these zones, you will get a ticket. The zones will remain in force through Nov. 15. If you have unbuckled children under the age of 4 in your car when you"re stopped, you will have to appear in traffic court. You can also get a ticket if you"re unbelted in an SUV or passenger van - your truck plate won"t make you exempt. In July, watch out at these intersections: Emerson and English, Emerson and Southeastern, Holt and Washington, Holt and Morris, Lynhurst and 10th, Lynhurst and Washington, Washington and Illinois, Washington and Delaware, 56th and Post, 79th and Fall Creek, 30th and Mitthoeffer, 30th and Post, Raceway and Rockville, Raceway and 10th, Capitol and Washington and Meridian and Ohio.

ï Cleaning up the town: The latest subject of the Bart Peterson clean-up initiative is the American Inn-North, 7202 E. 82nd St., which will be ceasing operations July 31, demolished and converted to a commercial office park. Previous motels targeted include the near-Northside Citizen"s Lodge, which the Mayor"s Office says was the Indianapolis Police Department"s No. 1 criminal hotspot in the city, and the Southside Dollar Inn, shut down for code violations. All nine Dollar Inns owned by that Inn"s owner, along with the Skyline Motel, 6617 E. Washington St., and the Indy East Motel, 5855 E. Washington St., are under close scrutiny from the city and will have to adhere to strict conditions to stay licensed. "Our goal is not to target honest, hard-working landlords," Peterson said in a statement, "but we will continue to go after those who don"t hold up their end of the bargain to the city and to their neighborhood."

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