Compiled by DRH

ï Look out below! Two hundred and seventy-one Indiana municipalities reported releases of more than 3.5 billion gallons of untreated and partially treated sewage in 6,757 incidents from Jan. 1, 1997, to May 2, 2002. From 2000 to 2001, the reported gallons released increased 67 percent and the number of reported incidents increased 31 percent. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management believes that part of the increase is due to more accurate and complete reporting. Indianapolis contributed almost 10 percent of the total incidents from its two plants, with an average of 10 incidents per month. Some say the results raise doubts about IDEM"s consistency and effectiveness in enforcing water quality and public health regulations. ï As expected, Sister Kathleen Desautels, 64, formerly of Indianapolis, was sentenced last week to six months in federal prison for trespass during last fall"s annual protest against a U.S. Army training school that has taught thousands of Latin American soldiers, including Manuel Noriega and several known assassins, in counter-revolutionary and counter-narcotics tactics ("Nun Faces Prison," NUVO, June 26, 2002). Desautels was one of 37 protesters convicted, many of whom wore T-shirts proclaiming, "You Can Jail the Resisters But You Can"t Jail the Resistance." The morning after the sentencing, another protester chained shut the gates to Fort Benning, home of the former School of Americas, now renamed the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation. The protester then locked herself to the gates underneath a sign that read, "Lock up SOA/WHISC, Not Peacemakers!"

ï Saturday"s Indianapolis Star followed up a week of breathless coverage of Al Unser Jr."s arrest for battery on his girlfriend with an Associated Press story entitled "Unser Used Drugs, Man Tells Paper." Well, kind of. But in the highly competitive world of journalism that follows celebrity screw-ups like Unser"s, it was worthy of note that the Albuquerque Journal"s Friday edition was not the first to report that a former Unser employee accused Unser of routinely using marijuana and cocaine to excess. Ex-Star auto racing reporter Robin Miller got there first, reporting the accusation and a lot more in a lengthy and detailed Wednesday article on rpm.espn.com. Miller, who was fired last January after 33 years at The Star, once again scooped The Star"s auto racing reporters, which racing fans and journalists say is a regular occurrence. That was apparently too much for the Gannett-ized paper to admit.

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