with additional reporting by Fran Quigley A Quaker-style memorial service, celebrating the life of Butler University political science professor Dale Hathaway, was held last Sunday. There, English professor Carol Reed told the gathered crowd of more than 300 a story that came to symbolize Hathaway"s legacy as an educator even before his sudden death in Florence, Italy, on May 22. Hathaway was well-known for his quiet, eminently logical teaching style, so it came as a great surprise to his students when he requested one day that they leave his first floor classroom by the window, rather than the door. Puzzled, the students clambered down to find a grinning Hathaway who asked them, "Do you always do everything an authority figure tells you to do?" Hathaway began challenging the status quo early in life. In a letter to President Kennedy in 1962, 10-year-old Dale begged him not to resume nuclear testing, and said he had the data to back up his position. Dale worked a number of odd jobs before embarking on his distinguished academic career, receiving his BA in economics from UC Santa Cruz in 1982, and earning a Ph.D. in political science from Cornell University in 1990. That same year, he arrived at Butler University, where he taught courses on politics in the U.S. and abroad, public policy, the politics of film and an interdisciplinary course called "Change and Tradition." As befitting his devotion to curricular innovation and encouraging students" off-campus involvement, Hathaway was leading a "Change and Tradition" study tour in Italy when he died. He is survived by his wife Dorothy, their four children and four grandchildren. Fellow Butler political science professor Margaret Brabant says it wasn"t Hathaway"s impressive academic pedigree that made him an effective educator and activist; rather, it was his ability to combine his well-developed theories with practice. Hathaway wrote two books on the labor movement, and applied his intellect to a wide array of community issues: the Indianapolis Peace and Justice Center, conflict resolution programs, progressive third party politics, the Jobs with Justice campaign and, most recently, the Community Faith and Labor Coalition"s efforts to establish a living wage for municipal workers. On Butler"s campus, Hathaway helped to found the gender studies program, supported groups like Amnesty International and Butler for Peace, promoted service-learning and internships and organized discussion forums on timely subjects, including a panel on Islam and U.S. foreign policy shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. "We"ve had such a loss," says fellow living wage activist Nancy Holle. "[Dale] had almost a voracious appetite for throwing himself into things. He had to have had 48 hours in his days." Though Dale Hathaway"s gentle grace, unflagging optimism and tireless commitment to education and social justice will be greatly missed, both on Butler"s campus and beyond, Holle and Brabant say he will not soon be forgotten. "The legacy of any good teacher is the number of people who continue your work after you"re gone," Brabant says. "This was a man who understood what Margaret Mead meant when she said that the only force that ever changes anything is a committed individual working for the common good."

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