Pierce is a music business jack-of-all-trades. He’s an Aries and likes Thai food and the color blue. Luna Music has a caricatured reputation for being a High Fidelity type of record store, music elitist employees included. How does that comparison hit you? The reference to High Fidelity is something I’m sure every indie record store has dealt with since the release of the movie, simply because they did a good job of portraying a certain type independent business. As for the music elitist element, I think one could make a comparison to our stores because we are all passionate about what we do, but I believe that’s where it would end. Everyone’s tastes are so varied — it isn’t my job to pass judgment on something so personal to so many people; however, it is my job to stock a deep catalog of all genres and tastes and to try and know as much as possible about them. What does the Luna Music family project rundown look like these days? In addition to our two storefronts in Indy, we also operate a handful of record labels out of the back room of our Northside location (recordhead, the Fading Captain Series, mr. whiggs records, Sprite Recordings). We also handle press and radio promotion for our releases. There’s the design/layout/artwork umbrella known as the MPERFECTDESIGNCO, which includes wigtea design, mperfect, alltypedesign and one 9 seven. We also operate a small non-profit organization called Caffeinated Robots that helps provide music lessons for underprivileged children. What upcoming projects are you really jazzed about? One of the artists on our label, Bloomington’s own Brando, is generating quite a buzz surrounding its forthcoming release 943 Recluse. Brando is the subject of a full-page story in the current issue of Magnet magazine, and has been making waves at college radio. Speaking of High Fidelity, what are your top five favorite records right now? The current list is Talib Kweli Beautiful Mixtape, The Stills Logic Will Break Your Heart, Iron & Wine Our Endless Numbered Days, Kanye West The College Dropout and Rhymefest Blue Collar Collection. Are there any records that you’re into now that are a little hard to admit audibly? Have you heard that new Britney Spears song? Loud? In your car? You should. What is it about indie music that inspires the adamancy, obsession, ownership and loyal endearment of its aficionados? I’m sure a good portion of it comes from the fact it’s independent. Stumbling upon these treasures is a glorious feeling, and for one reason or another some people don’t want to share and expose these things. Maybe it is because they feel a sense of “ownership” in them — you know, “I found this group, and I am going to be the only one of my friends to know about them.” But that doesn’t really make any sense to me. I WANT everyone to hear my favorite records. I WANT to play you my favorite B-side. I WANT you to be as excited about it as I am. Sure, you may not love them as much as I, but then again you may.

0
0
0
0
0

Recommended for you