A new trend for jazz lovers is beginning downtown. What is unique is that you can have your live jazz for breakfast and also a late evening supper in two distinct locations noted for their food. One of the most venerable dining venues based in downtown Indy since 1933 is the Elbow Room at 605 N. Pennsylvania. Its new owner of 90 days is Marco Solari, who is a lover of good music - especially jazz - and dining with flare and style. Solari says, "My goal is to create a new European flavor in this classic building." He has eagerly set up a gem of a Sunday jazz brunch that runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every week. What makes this distinctive dining is a menu offering selections unique to most brunches and live jazz that matches the warm-paneled ambiance of the Elbow Room. When I stopped in last Sunday, I was totally taken by surprise on two counts. First, neatly tucked into the point of the dining room, surrounded by windows on Penn, North and Ft. Wayne streets, were two house guitarists, both playing classic Guild guitars, which were favorites of jazz guitarists of the "50s and "60s. I was in awe as they were softly swinging away on a Charlie Parker bebop classic, "Half Nelson." Tom Sullivan was comping rhythm and changes while Jack Brengle was sculpting sharp solo lines with a dark tone. Then they reversed roles, with Brengle taking over rhythm changes and Sullivan stepping to the forefront with a lighter tone, playing more understated, lean, long lines in his solo. These guys were cooking away with tremendous interaction and technique as players who have paid their musical dues. As it turns out, both have. Brengle was a full-time musician in New York during the modern jazz revolution of the "50s and "60s, playing with the likes of bebop guitarist Jimmy Raney and in the Buddy Rich Band, to name a few. Sullivan led two pop/rock bands, Telegraph in the "70s and Merger in the early "90s, playing locally and touring with both. Both men left the music world, but the passion of playing and especially a love for jazz has brought them back. Brengle and Sullivan adroitly performed their set with contemporary tunes from "All My Tomorrows" to an up-tempoed boppish version of "Have You Met Miss Jones" to "Billie Bounce." I never missed hearing bass or drums the way these two talents were blending with taste, a great sense of dynamics and passion in their playing. The second surprise was what is offered at the Elbow Room"s Sunday jazz brunch. I mean, move over New Orleans, the Elbow Room has a signature appetizer with its own Blueberry Beignets with a raspberry sauce that for me is a must. To even top that off is owner Solari"s sense of humor with what he calls a "Pajama Breakfast" that is a nine-course delight, including juice and coffee for under 10 bucks. If you don"t want the PJ Breakfast, there are choices from a diverse menu to choose from. Beignets, Pajama Breakfast and the smooth hip guitars of Brengle and Sullivan: It doesn"t get any better for jazz lovers than the Sunday jazz brunch at the Elbow Room. Where do you go for top-flight live jazz and dining from 7 to 10 p.m. on a Sunday evening downtown? Ruth"s Chris Steakhouse in the Circle Centre Mall is more that filling the bill in its third week of "Sizzling Steaks and Jazz." I caught the debut of veteran percussionist Kevin Kaiser"s new trio last Sunday with a lineup of Charlie Smith on guitar and Dave Murray on bass. It was the room"s first all-instrumental group and they were a perfect fit. This is a tight performing trio with Kaiser serving his role with a strong feel for dynamics and giving proper attention to the right percussive instruments for the room and moods. Smith and Murray carry the brunt of the solo work, but special attention has to be given to Smith"s very potent playing as of late. He continues to musically grow and is playing freer than I have ever heard him before. Even with the intimate confines of playing for diners, Smith caught fire on "Coming Home Baby," ripping off multiple choruses, each more tension-building and innovative than the previous, with Kaiser and Murray urging him on. This trio swung with an intense cohesiveness that was a joy to hear and got a well-deserved round of applause from the crowd on hand. They covered a wide range of tunes from "Stolen Moments," done with tasty solos, to the medium-tempo song "A Paper Moon" and "All The Things You Are." Its Latin accent gave Kaiser a chance to solo with subtlety and incorporate both jazz and Latin feelings. This was Kaiser"s first outing with this trio in a venue for jazz fans. They cook with a tasty heat. Jazz happenings With autumn officially here, take the chill out of the air with this week"s offerings of warm jazz. The Jazz Kitchen will party Friday, Sept. 27 with the eclectic sounds of Dog Talk for two shows at 8 and 10 p.m. The 16-piece wall of sound of the Jimmy Coe Big Band will play the swinging sounds of Basie and Ellington on Saturday, Sept. 28, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. The Chatterbox has the return of the hard bop alto sax of the Jason Curry Quartet Friday, Sept. 27. Trumpeter Kyle Quass" Group with new players and featuring innovative originals plays Saturday, Sept. 28. Sets both nights are 10:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Adam"s Mark Hotel Downtown"s Tiffany Rose Lounge has the piano of the Frank Puzzullo Trio performing on Friday and Saturday from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Sullivan"s Steakhouse features the trio of Claude Sifferlen on piano, Joe Deal on bass and Kevin Johnson on drums Friday and Saturday, Sept. 27 and 28, playing 7 to 11:30 p.m. The Indianapolis Artsgarden has free concerts with Gary Walters playing Thursday, Sept. 26 and the Glitz Jazz Quartet performing Friday, Sept. 27. Music both days runs from 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. Chuck Workman is the producer/ host of the Sunday Morning Jazz Show at 107.9 WTPI.

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