"By Ray E. Boomhower, Indiana Historical Society Press; $17.95

The extraordinary gutsiness of Ernie Pyle, who grew up on a farm in small-town Dana, Ind., can serve as an inspiration to anyone who thinks it’s not possible to get un-stuck from the way things are. Pyle broke out of every constraint within the newspaper industry to bring forward the stories of ordinary people doing something of consequence because they were curious, compassionate or calculating.

When World War II broke out, Pyle itched to get into the action as a reporter. His dispatches from Europe became a part of popular culture with the film The Story of G.I. Joe. As with his stories, this film put a personal stamp on war.

By the time Pyle got to cover the war in the Pacific, he had become a household name, synonymous with telling the story as it is, neither glamorizing nor suppressing the truth. This slim volume, supposedly aimed at young readers but of interest to all ages, is further enhanced with samples of WWII columns, a fine bibliography and a listing of Pyle historic sites. For more information log on to www.indianahistory.org.

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