Television

When we last saw Clarence Reynolds on TV, he was saying goodbye as anchorman on WXIN Channel 59's funky but low-rated Fox 59 a.m. That was more than two years ago. Now he's back in a much more prominent role: as lead correspondent on Antiques Roadshow FYI (Jan. 19, 8 p.m., WFYI Channel 20). Clarence Reynolds is lead correspondent on 'Antiques Roadshow FYI.'

The new PBS series answers the question: What happens after people get their items appraised on Antiques Roadshow? Much like ABC's How'd They Do That?, which follows up segments from Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, and Oxygen's Oprah After the Show, Antiques Roadshow FYI gets to the story behind the stories.

"It really has an appeal for everyone," says Reynolds, who now goes by his nickname, Clay. "We are doing the kind of segments that are extremely wide-reaching."

Both the series and Reynolds begin with a bang. He follows up with a woman who brought a copy of the Beatles' "butcher block" album to Antiques Roadshow, where it was appraised for $10,000. The woman tells Reynolds she sold the record for at least that much, using part of the proceeds for a trip to London, where she walked across Abbey Road.

Reynolds has two more segments in the first half hour, one on how to identify cracks in porcelain, another on restoring antique stoves. "I think I've got a little sandblasting in my throat still," he says with a laugh. "I went through the whole [restoration] process, sandblasting, painting, everything. And everyone will want one. That's how nice they are."

Reynolds spends three days a week on the road doing stories. Although he lives downtown, "I really live at the airport," he jokes.

Segments have taken him around the country, though he found his most interesting story (so far) in Northern Indiana. It started with a woman who went on Antiques Roadshow with a double-wide rocking chair. Another woman who saw that segment had a chair exactly like it. The new series gets them together.

Dealing in antiques and other goods suits Reynolds, who originally came to Indianapolis after working on the air for the QVC shopping network. After leaving Channel 59, he worked in communications for the Indiana Dental Association and Indiana Black Expo.

In the new job, he says, it's tempting to want to buy, buy, buy. He has only given in once. "In Houston, Texas, I bought a mosaic disco ball," he says. "I like mosaic tile and I do mosaic tile as a hobby. It wasn't the regular Spencer Gifts disco ball; it was done mosaic style. I said, 'I've gotta have that.'"

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