Review: Goodine and Richardson at Herron

Linda Adele Goodine, "Snow Scroll"

Linda Adele Goodine and Mark Richardson may share at least a couple things in common — they're married and both work at Herron — but their artwork is largely divergent. They've each been afforded half the Marsh Gallery in this joint exhibition, and the entire package is enticing and impressive.

Goodine’s photographs may invite and allure — due to their large size, appealing compositions, rich saturated colors and striking subject matter — but they inspire discomfort upon closer inspection. Animal skins, teeth on the winter ground, frozen sedum and vulnerable partially clothed young women confront the viewer. Each photograph is a curious, dreamy moment cloaked in mystery and plucked from the artist’s imagination, fleshed out enough to convey a scene and a feeling, open-ended enough to allow viewers to complete the story.

Richardson’s portion of the exhibition takes a biting look at pedagogical and didactic materials. Clay forms with snarky titles and messages investigate the process of achieving knowledge and our preoccupation with “right” and “wrong” perspectives and methods. Titles such as “Learning to Read,” “A Good Education Is Hard to Come By,” “A Different Perspective or That’s All Wrong,” and “Rusty Brain Scan” lend an interesting context to his oddly beautiful clay artwork and lead to a questioning of education’s place, methodology and availability in our society. At Herron School of Art + Design, Marsh Gallery, through Feb. 2.

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