'Portfolio 1'

 

Mark Ruschman challenged six artists to create new artwork using digital imagery processes: Dorothy Stites-Alig, Robert Eagerton, Peg Fierke, Tom Keesee, Tamar Kander and Barry Gealt, who collaborated with Arthur Liou. The resulting six pigment prints are on display and available as a portfolio or in limited number as individual prints (edition size 35). Also on view: one-of-a-kind works by the artists made using their primary mediums, namely painting or printmaking. Utilizing the computer as an artmaking tool is new for Keesee and Stites-Alig, but not Eagerton, who began working with digital processes as an extension of his printmaking in 1986. His "Two Crows" pairs a photonegative-like white silhouette of birds on branches next to an image of two dark rocks amongst the white rapids of a stream. Revealed within his framing devices is a momentary balance of motion and light. Stites-Alig's composition of plant imagery in "An Occasion of Senna" began with her "usual layers - an aquatint, a watercolor, a drawing and a photograph," and her sensitivity to textures and color translates beautifully. Lost within the digital print universe is the physicality of Gealt's well-known, heavy impasto painting. In his oil "Giant Rolling Waves," paint protrudes an inch from the canvas in places and light radiates from his abstract sky. In my mind, I see a palette knife and paint being swung with gusto, and in the gallery, I see the immediacy of Gealt's action recorded in space on the canvas. Imagining a hand controlling a mouse or a brush tool just isn't the same. Through Feb. 28; 317-634-3114, www.ruschmangallery.com.

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