'Harrison, Kleeman & Miller'

 

David Kleeman and Mark Alan Miller create pictorial artworks that are reactions to systems of society. Kleeman's three Surrealist-influenced sculptures - found object assemblages - are indicative of his best-known works. But multitudes of small, allegorical vinyl paintings reveal Kleeman's humorous, absurd, sometimes poetic or even political takes on life. Nothing in Kleeman's compositions seems unintentional. The central, icon-like figure in "Flight" - a shirtless, blue-eyed black man with "MK" tattooed on one shoulder - wears a red crown that says "King." His white-winged, angelic speech bubble says "Flight" and a belted kingfisher bird perches on the right. As if reading a deck of tarot cards, understanding Kleeman's imagery requires individual interpretation. Miller's mixed media paintings and drawings employ guides - such as mathematic patterns - with techniques that borrow from nonobjective painting or architectural drawing, for instance. Think Paul Klee when imagining his palette and patterns. "Hurt City II" is divided into horizontal sections by bands of tile grids. A light blue circle in the upper right emits light like an eye and provides a starting point to determine the order - or disorder - that follows. This is when Miller's work is most interesting. The system he sets up is interrupted, causing one to ask why. Through Feb. 28; 317-396-3886, www.harrisoncenter.org.

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