"When the artist-activists known as the Guerrilla Girls lectured at the Art Education Association of Indiana Conference, I had high hopes for a theatrical experience to match the biting posters and billboards with which they have shamed male-dominated art institutions. The self-congratulatory retrospective of their feminist commentaries won a standing ovation from the audience of mostly female art instructors, but the lecture/slide show format could not be as thrilling as their early guerilla tactics must have been. A small group of women artists, wearing gorilla masks to protect their anonymity, began Guerilla Girls 22 years ago by pasting posters throughout New York City in the middle of the night to draw attention to just how little attention women and minority artists were getting in galleries and museums. One early poster simply listed how many one-person exhibitions four major museums had devoted to women artists: just one. A later billboard, depicting a reclining female nude in gorilla mask, asked passersby, “Do women have to be naked to get into the Met Museum?” A revolving membership of five to 20 “Girls” have gone on to write books and create art installations for some of the museums they have criticized, but it doesn’t seem like much has changed for women and minority artists — and filmmakers, musicians, scientists, etc. If real revolution requires more people, this lecture makes a good starter kit for locals to launch their own troop. —Josefa Beyer "

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