Dance Review | What you missed Imagine a painting that dances. That"s just what three visionary pieces accomplished in Dance Kaleidoscope"s Flights of Fancy last weekend. Beyond delighting our mental, visual and aural perceptions, this show fascinated viewers with its interplay of the arts.

Kenoth Shane Patton and Liberty Harrison in DK"s "Flights of Fancy"

Picture Paris at the turn of the last century. Around 1905, Picasso"s pictures boasted a bohemian mix: painters, poets and performers of cabaret and circus. In Norman Walker"s "The Piercing Gaze," these characters represented Picasso"s Pink, Rose and Blue periods. A year"s research on the relevant masterpieces enabled Walker to transform their visual styles into movement. Picasso dressed as Harlequin, the Commedia dell"Arte clown who became the circus-struck painter"s alter ego in many self-portraits. Andre Megerdichian"s Picasso both observed and participated in the dances, often accomplishing acrobatic feats with panache. His growing involvement with his characters pointed to all artists" complex relation to their subjects. Just who appears on the canvas? David Hochoy"s "Moulin Rouge" also treated a turn-of-the-century artist"s ambiguous link to his subjects. Capturing Toulouse-Lautrec"s vision of gay "90s Paris, Hochoy exposed the suffering behind the happy mask. Using puppets of themselves to vent their frustrations, the cabaret players danced out part of what led to World War I. Finally stripped almost literally bare, Lautrec became his own subject: the ultimate union of observer and observed. Kenoth Shane Patton made the diseased artist both fragile and masterful. Cynthia Pratt"s tribute to Dada, "Rock, Paper, Scissors," expressed the cynical anger of European artists" reaction to the war. While the dancing evoked Dada"s revolutionary contempt for tradition, it also displayed formal rigor. The Dadaists claimed to reject everything, but their destruction inevitably created new art. Similarly, while Pratt"s piece seemed to deny content, it actually conveyed uniquely innovative meaning - namely, the pregnant influence of modern dance on ballet.

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