The Bush Administration has received plenty of flak lately for a mixed message on job growth. One particular official, in fact, remarked some weeks ago that outsourcing jobs to other countries was actually good for the U.S. economy. In light of this recent controversy, one fast food newcomer’s plan seems especially significant. Buddy Burgers, based in Omaha, Neb., has over 5,000 fast food outlets in North America. Though Buddy Burgers is nowhere near the level of McDonald’s, Burger King and other fast food giants, they are poised to revolutionize the business. How? Outsourcing. Buddy Burgers CEO and founder Bip Buddy asks us to imagine the following: “You drive into Buddy Burgers and go up to the menu, ordering your food. That order is immediately sent elsewhere, to China or Brazil — we haven’t figured that out yet. There, wage-earners working for a fraction of what fast food workers make here in America cook your burgers just the way you want them, then they are instantly freeze-dried and loaded onto a plane.” Bip Buddy says some of the details of his plan are not worked out, but that “the plane is a supersonic one, of course, and so within minutes, it’s delivered to your Buddy Burger outlet, warmed up in a microwave and handed to you, fresh and tasty.” Buddy predicts that while most fast food stores required up to three dozen employees, his Buddy Burger restaurant will only require two: “One to heat up the delivered orders, the other to take your money and give you change.” As the economy eventually moves away from a cash-currency and into an all-plastic format, Buddy believes that his restaurants can shave down their employee base to one per restaurant. A trial run at this outsourcing of fast food is slated to take place this summer in an area of town yet to be named.

0
0
0
0
0