Review: Butterflies of Indiana: A Field Guide 

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click to enlarge Butterflies of Indiana: A Field Guide - Jeffrey E. Belth - Indiana University Press, Indiana Natural Science series
  • Butterflies of Indiana: A Field Guide
    Jeffrey E. Belth
    Indiana University Press, Indiana Natural Science series

Come on. Do you really need me to say anything about this book, but the title over and over again? It's a guide to butterflies of Indiana, people! What else do you need? You either are a butterfly person or you aren't, though it's really difficult to imagine non-butterfly people even exist.

Let's try it out. "Hi, my name is Jim. I love Indiana basketball and locally made beer - but I'm not really into Indiana butterflies. Tried to smear one on my toast this morning, didn't work. Who needs 'em?"

Lucky you, butterfly lover. This book features nearly 150 species of butterflies and skippers (no, that's not a friend of Barbie), with over 500 color photographs and plenty of prose, including a bit about the natural history of butterflies.

Hmmmm... Sounds like a Valentine's Day present for a special someone! Nothing says "romance" like a butterfly! Now if I could just find the jam.

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