Favorite

Amazon oil spill kills fish, sickens natives 

click to enlarge Dead fish from an oil spill in the Peruvian Amazon are mixed with oil-covered twigs gathered by local residents. Fish are vital to the villagers' diet and income. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Dead fish from an oil spill in the Peruvian Amazon are mixed with oil-covered twigs gathered by local residents. Fish are vital to the villagers' diet and income.
  • Barbara Fraser


By Barbara Fraser
Environmental Health News

Nota del Editor: La versión en español de esta historia sigue la versión Inglés.

July 23, 2014

CUNINICO, Peru – On the last day of June, Roger Mangía Vega watched an oil slick and a mass of dead fish float past this tiny Kukama Indian community and into the Marañón River, a major tributary of the Amazon.

Community leaders called the emergency number for Petroperu, the state-run operator of the 845-kilometer pipeline that pumps crude oil from the Amazon over the Andes Mountains to a port on Peru’s northern coast.

click to enlarge Local men were covered with oil after being hired to find the leak in the submerged pipeline. - Hombres locales quedaron cubiertos de petróleo después de ser contratados para encontrar la fuga en el oleoducto sumergido. - MUNICIPALITY OF URARINAS
  • Local men were covered with oil after being hired to find the leak in the submerged pipeline. Hombres locales quedaron cubiertos de petróleo después de ser contratados para encontrar la fuga en el oleoducto sumergido.
  • Municipality of Urarinas


By late afternoon, Mangía and a handful of his neighbors – contracted by the company and wearing only ordinary clothing – were up to their necks in oily water, searching for a leak in the pipe. Villagers, who depend on fish for subsistence and income, estimated that they had seen between two and seven tons of dead fish floating in lagoons and littering the landscape.

click to enlarge Scaffolding holds a broken section of the oil pipeline. - Andamios sostienen una sección rota del oleoducto. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Scaffolding holds a broken section of the oil pipeline. Andamios sostienen una sección rota del oleoducto.
  • Barbara Fraser


“It was the most horrible thing I’ve seen in my life – the amount of oil, the huge number of dead fish and my Kukama brothers working without the necessary protection,” said Ander Ordóñez Mozombite, an environmental monitor for an indigenous community group called Acodecospat who visited the site a few days later.

This rupture of Peru’s 39-year-old northern crude oil pipeline has terrified Kukama villagers along the Marañón River. People’s complaints of nausea and skin rashes are aggravated by nervousness about eating the fish, concerns about their lost income and fears that oil will spread throughout the tropical forest and lakes when seasonal flooding begins in November. Cuninico, a village of wooden, stilt-raised, palm-thatched houses, is home to about 130 families but several hundred families in other communities also fish nearby.

Three weeks after they discovered the spill, the villagers still have more questions than answers about the impacts.

"It sounds like an environmental debacle for the people and the ecosystem,” said David Abramson, deputy director of the National Center of Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University’s Earth Institute in New York.

“There is a need for public health and environmental monitoring at a minimum of four levels – water, fish, vegetation and the population," he said.

click to enlarge Kukama community leaders walk along the pipeline through a marshy area. - Company officials at Petroperu did not return phone calls and emails seeking comment. - Líderes de comunidades kukama recorren el oleoducto a través de una zona pantanosa. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Kukama community leaders walk along the pipeline through a marshy area.Company officials at Petroperu did not return phone calls and emails seeking comment. Líderes de comunidades kukama recorren el oleoducto a través de una zona pantanosa.
  • Barbara Fraser


Government officials have not officially announced how much crude oil spilled. However, in a radio interview, Energy and Mines Minister Eleodoro Mayorga mentioned 2,000 barrels, which is 84,000 gallons.

Indigenous leaders noted that the pipeline, which began operating again July 12 after the repairs, has a history of leaks.

Leaders of at least four neighboring communities said masses of dead fish appeared in lagoons and streams in the week before the oil spill was reported, indicating that it could have been leaking for days before it was spotted.

Even fish that escaped the worst of the spill could be poisoned, experts said. Fishermen who traveled an hour or two up the Urituyacu River, a tributary of the Marañón, in search of a catch unaffected by the spill returned with fish that they said tasted of oil.

Some Amazonian fish migrate long distances, and ongoing monitoring will be important for determining how fisheries recover, said Diana Papoulias, a fish biologist with E-Tech International, a New Mexico-based engineering firm that advises indigenous Peruvian communities on oil-related issues.

click to enlarge SERNAN
  • SERNAN


Key concerns include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are classified as probable human carcinogens and can cause skin, liver and immune system problems, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Exposure to PAHs in the womb has been linked to effects on children’s brain development, including learning and behavioral changes.

For pregnant women, the fish become a “double-edged sword,” Abramson said. “They need that protein source to enhance the neurological development of the fetus, but at the same time, you don’t want them ingesting things that have unknown impacts.”

Mothers said children and adults in their families are suffering from stomachaches, nausea, vomiting and dizziness, and small children have skin rashes after bathing in the rivers.

In this part of the Marañón valley, the nearest health center is more than an hour away by boat and does not have a doctor.

The government’s Environmental Evaluation and Oversight Agency (Organismo de Evaluación y Fiscalización Ambiental, OEFA) has taken no samples of fish tissue for testing, according to Delia Morales, the agency's assistant director of inspection.

Much of the oil settled in pools along the pipeline during the flood season, creating a viscous soup where dying fish flopped weakly. Government officials said damage was limited to a 700-meter stretch along the pipeline. The ground and tree trunks in the forest on both sides of the pipeline were also stained with oil, in a swath local residents estimated at up to 300 meters wide. When that area begins to flood again in November, villagers fear that contamination could spread.

click to enlarge Kukama women wash clothes in the river that also provides water for drinking, cooking and bathing. - Mujeres kukama lavan ropa en el río, que también provee agua para beber, cocinar y bañarse. - RADIO UCAMARA
  • Kukama women wash clothes in the river that also provides water for drinking, cooking and bathing.Mujeres kukama lavan ropa en el río, que también provee agua para beber, cocinar y bañarse.
  • Radio Ucamara


Petroperu hired men from the village of Cuninico to find the leak and raise the pipeline out of the canal to repair it. Several of the men said they were up to their necks in oily water, working in T-shirts and pants or stripped to their underwear. They said they received protective gear only when a Peruvian TV crew arrived more than two weeks later. The July 20 newscast led to a shakeup in Petroperu’s leadership.

Meanwhile, the workers’ wives wash their clothes in the Marañón River, squatting on rafts moored along the bank. Besides being the only transportation route in the area, the river is the source of water for drinking, cooking, bathing and washing.

Within a week after the spill, the local fish market had dried up. Women who normally sold 10 to 20 kilos of fish a day said their usual buyers shunned them. Children in Cuninico told a reporter from Radio Ucamara, a local radio station, that fish had disappeared from the family table and they were eating mainly rice and cassava, a root.

Abramson said the villagers' mental health can be undermined by poor diet, income loss and conflicts between community members.

The pipeline has been repaired and the oil is flowing to the port again, but the long-term impacts of the spill are uncertain.

click to enlarge Glob of oil drips from a stick dipped into a pool beside the submerged pipeline. Un pegote de petróleo chorrea de un palo introducido en un charco junto al oleoducto sumergido. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Glob of oil drips from a stick dipped into a pool beside the submerged pipeline. Un pegote de petróleo chorrea de un palo introducido en un charco junto al oleoducto sumergido.
  • Barbara Fraser


Light and bacteria help break down oil naturally, said Edward Overton, a chemistry professor in Louisiana State University’s Department of Environmental Studies who has studied the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Volatile substances in the oil, which dissolve readily in water, could have caused the fish kills if the pipeline had been leaking for a time before the spill was reported, he said.

“The rule of thumb is that during the spill it’s a horrible mess, and two or three years later it’s hard to find evidence,” Overton said.

But that may not be the case in Amazonian wetlands, where clay soil and high water limit the oxygen available to oil-eating microbes, said Ricardo Segovia, a hydrogeologist with E-Tech International.

The government’s environmental agency is expected to issue its report on the spill by the end of this month and could levy fines, Morales said.

Villagers are waiting to see whether the government will sanction its own pipeline operation and pay damages.

“It sounds as though the state is in a precarious position,” Abramson said. “It [the government of Peru] has to monitor and assure the health and well-being of the population, but it may be one of the agents that is liable [for the spill]. They have to monitor themselves and decide what is fair and equitable.”

For questions or feedback about this piece, contact EHN Editor in Chief Marla Cone at mcone@ehn.org.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ By Bárbara Fraser
Environmental Health News

Translated from English by William Chico Colugna English version here.

July 23, 2014

En el último día de junio, Roger Mangía Vega vio una mancha de petróleo y una masa de peces muertos deslizándose frente a esta pequeña comunidad indígena kukama hasta dar en el río Marañón, un importante afluente del Amazonas.

Los líderes de la comunidad llamaron al número de emergencia de Petroperú, el operador estatal del oleoducto de 845 kilómetros que bombea petróleo crudo desde la Amazonia y, después de cruzar la Cordillera de los Andes, hasta un puerto en la costa norte del Perú.

click to enlarge Local men were covered with oil after being hired to find the leak in the submerged pipeline. - Hombres locales quedaron cubiertos de petróleo después de ser contratados para encontrar la fuga en el oleoducto sumergido. - MUNICIPALITY OF URARINAS
  • Local men were covered with oil after being hired to find the leak in the submerged pipeline. Hombres locales quedaron cubiertos de petróleo después de ser contratados para encontrar la fuga en el oleoducto sumergido.
  • Municipality of Urarinas


Al caer la tarde, Mangía y un puñado de sus vecinos – contratados por la empresa y vestidos sólo con ropa ordinaria— estaban metidos hasta el cuello en el agua aceitosa, buscando una fuga en la tubería. Los aldeanos, que dependen de la pesca para su subsistencia e ingresos, estimaron que habían visto entre dos y siete toneladas de peces muertos flotando en lagunas y esparcidos por el paisaje.

click to enlarge Scaffolding holds a broken section of the oil pipeline. - Andamios sostienen una sección rota del oleoducto. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Scaffolding holds a broken section of the oil pipeline. Andamios sostienen una sección rota del oleoducto.
  • Barbara Fraser


“Fue la cosa más horrible que he visto en mi vida: la cantidad de petróleo, la enorme cantidad de peces muertos y mis hermanos kukama trabajando sin la protección necesaria”, dijo Ander Ordóñez Mozombite, monitor ambiental de un grupo comunal indígena llamado Acodecospat que visitó el sitio a los pocos días.

Esta ruptura en el oleoducto norperuano, que ya tiene 39 años de antigüedad, ha aterrorizado a los aldeanos kukama a lo largo del río Marañón. Además de las quejas por náuseas y erupciones en la piel, la gente siente nerviosismo por comer pescado, preocupaciones por la pérdida de ingresos y temor de que el petróleo se esparza por todo el bosque tropical y los lagos cuando comience la inundación estacional en noviembre. Cuninico, una aldea de casas de madera y techos de palma levantadas sobre pilotes, alberga unas 130 familias, pero varios cientos de familias de otras comunidades también pescan cerca de allí.

Tres semanas después de descubrir el derrame, los aldeanos todavía tienen más preguntas que respuestas acerca de los impactos.

“Suena como una debacle ambiental para la gente y el ecosistema”, dijo David Abramson, subdirector del Centro Nacional de Preparación para Desastres del Instituto de la Tierra de la Universidad de Columbia en Nueva York.

“Se necesita un monitoreo de la salud pública y del medio ambiente en un mínimo de cuatro niveles: agua, peces, vegetación y la población”, dijo.

Directivos de Petroperú no devolvieron las llamadas telefónicas y correos electrónicos que solicitaban sus comentarios.

click to enlarge Kukama community leaders walk along the pipeline through a marshy area. - Company officials at Petroperu did not return phone calls and emails seeking comment. - Líderes de comunidades kukama recorren el oleoducto a través de una zona pantanosa. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Kukama community leaders walk along the pipeline through a marshy area.Company officials at Petroperu did not return phone calls and emails seeking comment. Líderes de comunidades kukama recorren el oleoducto a través de una zona pantanosa.
  • Barbara Fraser


Las autoridades no han anunciado oficialmente cuánto petróleo crudo se derramó. Sin embargo, en una entrevista de radio, el ministro de Energía y Minas Eleodoro Mayorga mencionó 2,000 barriles, que son 84,000 galones. Los líderes indígenas señalaron que el oleoducto, que comenzó a operar de nuevo el 12 de julio después de reparaciones, tiene un historial de fugas.

Los líderes de al menos cuatro comunidades vecinas dijeron que masas de peces muertos aparecieron en lagunas y arroyos una semana antes de que se informase del derrame de petróleo, lo que indica que la fuga podría haber estado produciéndose varios días antes de que fuera descubierta.

Incluso los peces que escaparon de lo peor del derrame podrían estar envenenados, dijeron expertos. Pescadores que viajaban una o dos horas aguas arriba del río Urituyacu, un afluente del Marañón, en busca de pesca no afectada por el derrame volvían con peces que dijeron sabían a petróleo.

Algunos peces amazónicos migran largas distancias, y el monitoreo permanente será importante para determinar cómo se recuperan las pesquerías, dijo Diana Papoulias, bióloga ictióloga de E-Tech International, una firma de ingeniería con sede en Nuevo México que asesora a comunidades indígenas peruanas en temas relacionados con el petróleo.

click to enlarge SERNAN
  • SERNAN


Las preocupaciones principales incluyen los hidrocarburos aromáticos policíclicos (HAP), que están clasificados como probables carcinógenos humanos y pueden causar problemas en la piel, el hígado y el sistema inmunológico, según los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades de Estados Unidos. La exposición a los HAP en el útero se ha relacionado con efectos sobre el desarrollo cerebral de los niños, incluyendo el aprendizaje y cambios de comportamiento.

En el caso de las mujeres embarazadas, los peces se convierten en un “arma de doble filo”, dijo Abramson. “Ellas necesitan esa fuente de proteínas para acrecentar el desarrollo neurológico del feto, pero al mismo tiempo, no conviene que ingieran cosas que tienen un impacto desconocido”.

Las madres dijeron que los niños y adultos de sus familias están sufriendo de dolores de estómago, náuseas, vómitos y mareos, y los niños pequeños tienen erupciones en la piel después de bañarse en los ríos.

En esta parte del valle del Marañón, el centro de salud más cercano está a más de una hora de distancia en lancha y no tiene un médico.

El gubernamental Organismo de Evaluación y Fiscalización Ambiental (OEFA) no ha tomado muestras de tejidos de peces para su examen, de acuerdo con Delia Morales, subdirectora de supervisión de dicha dependencia.

Gran parte del petróleo se asentó en charcos a lo largo del oleoducto durante la temporada de inundaciones, creando una sopa viscosa donde colapsaban los peces moribundos. Las autoridades dijeron que el daño se limitó a una franja de 700 metros a lo largo del oleoducto. El suelo y los troncos de los árboles en el bosque a ambos lados del oleoducto también estaban manchados de petróleo, en una extensión que los habitantes locales estimaron hasta de 300 metros de ancho. Cuando esa zona empiece a inundarse otra vez en noviembre, los aldeanos temen que la contaminación se extienda.

click to enlarge Kukama women wash clothes in the river that also provides water for drinking, cooking and bathing. - Mujeres kukama lavan ropa en el río, que también provee agua para beber, cocinar y bañarse. - RADIO UCAMARA
  • Kukama women wash clothes in the river that also provides water for drinking, cooking and bathing.Mujeres kukama lavan ropa en el río, que también provee agua para beber, cocinar y bañarse.
  • Radio Ucamara


Petroperú contrató hombres de la aldea de Cuninico para encontrar la fuga y levantar la tubería fuera del canal para repararla. Varios de los hombres dijeron que se metieron hasta el cuello en el agua aceitosa, trabajando con camisetas y pantalones o simplemente en ropa interior. Dijeron que recibieron ropa de protección sólo cuando un equipo de la televisión peruana llegó más de dos semanas después. Un noticiero del 20 de julio provocó una reorganización en la directiva de Petroperú.

Mientras tanto, las esposas de los trabajadores lavan su ropa en el río Marañón, en cuclillas sobre balsas amarradas a lo largo de la orilla. Además de ser la única ruta de transporte en la zona, el río es la fuente de agua para beber, cocinar, bañarse y lavar.

A la semana después del derrame, el mercado de pescado local prácticamente no funcionaba. Las mujeres que normalmente vendían de 10 a 20 kilos de pescado al día dijeron que sus compradores habituales las evitaban. En Cuninico, unos niños dijeron a un reportero de Radio Ucamara, una emisora local, que el pescado había desaparecido de la mesa familiar y comían principalmente arroz y yuca, una raíz.

Abramson dijo que la salud mental de los aldeanos puede verse afectada por la mala alimentación, la pérdida de ingresos y los conflictos entre los miembros de la comunidad.

El oleoducto ha sido reparado y el petróleo ya fluye hacia el puerto de nuevo, pero los efectos a largo plazo del derrame son inciertos.

click to enlarge Glob of oil drips from a stick dipped into a pool beside the submerged pipeline. Un pegote de petróleo chorrea de un palo introducido en un charco junto al oleoducto sumergido. - BARBARA FRASER
  • Glob of oil drips from a stick dipped into a pool beside the submerged pipeline. Un pegote de petróleo chorrea de un palo introducido en un charco junto al oleoducto sumergido.
  • Barbara Fraser


Un pegote de petróleo chorrea de un palo introducido en un charco junto al oleoducto sumergido. La luz y las bacterias ayudan a descomponer el petróleo naturalmente, dijo Edward Overton, profesor de química del Departamento de Estudios del Medio Ambiente de la Universidad Estatal de Louisiana que ha estudiado el derrame de petróleo de Deepwater Horizon en el Golfo de México. Sustancias volátiles en el petróleo, que se disuelven fácilmente en el agua, podrían haber causado la mortandad de peces si la fuga en el oleoducto se estuvo produciendo durante un tiempo antes de que se informase del derrame, dijo.

“Como regla general, durante el derrame hay un caos horrible, y dos o tres años más tarde es difícil encontrar pruebas”, dijo Overton.

Pero tal vez eso no sea así en los humedales amazónicos, donde el suelo de arcilla y el agua elevada limitan el oxígeno disponible para los microbios que se alimentan de petróleo, dijo Ricardo Segovia, hidrogeólogo de E-Tech International.

Se espera que el organismo ambiental del gobierno emita su informe sobre el derrame antes de fines de este mes, y podría imponer multas, dijo Morales. Los aldeanos están esperando a ver si el gobierno sancionará a su propio oleoducto y pagará daños y perjuicios.

“Pareciera que el Estado se encuentra en una posición precaria”, dijo Abramson. “[El gobierno peruano] tiene que supervisar y asegurar la salud y el bienestar de la población, pero puede ser uno de los agentes responsables [del derrame]. Tiene que supervisarse a sí mismo y decidir lo que es justo y equitativo”.

Si tiene preguntas o comentarios acerca de este artículo, contáctese con la editora en jefe Marla Cone en mcone@ehn.org.
Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Environmental Health News

  • DDT kills songbirds near Mich. Superfund site

    Robins in a nine-block area next to a Superfund site are "decimated," said toxicologist Matt Zwiernik. New tests show they contain some of the highest DDT levels ever seen in birds.
    • Jul 29, 2014
  • Living in polluted areas raises cancer risk

    Nonsmoking women who live many years in communities polluted with fine particles have an elevated risk of lung cancer, according to new research.
    • Jun 12, 2014
  • Top environmental news from 2013

    While there's nothing new about civil disobedience and other environmental protests, in 2013 they seemed to intensify and spread globally.
    • Jan 7, 2014
  • More »

Latest in Environment

Feedback

Recent Comments


© 2015 NUVO | Website powered by Foundation