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Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

This is an absurd article. I was told once not to pass out or hang up flyers FOR MY YARD SALE on Broad Ripple Ave. You know what I didn't do afterwards? Argue. You know what I also didn't do? Shoot anyone.

You can't pass out DJ flyers? Get the hell over it.
Somebody BUMPS INTO YOU? Don't pull out your gun and open fire. Have some self control and restraint.

3 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Lee on 07/09/2014 at 10:40 AM

Re: “Dodge City on the Central Canal

Can we just make gangbangers and those that portray them, illegal. That would make me feel a lot safer.

Posted by Darrel on 07/09/2014 at 8:04 AM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

I'm pretty sure everyone is thinking the same things. Hood-rats!

0 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Darren on 07/09/2014 at 7:57 AM

Re: “Racial Sensitivity 101

I agree that the gorilla outfits were out of line. Some things are now un-touchable by white people regardless of intention. Like it or not it is a fact.

Posted by austin on 07/09/2014 at 7:45 AM

Re: “Debunking "Black-on-Black crime"

I think debunking something that's not a myth is counterproductive and is apologetic at the very least. Black on black sums it up and is an issue that needs to be solved. Making it anything less is making excuses for a societal failure. Not a black failure a societal failure. We need to change inner cities. We need to do it now and if feelings get hurt along the way, then that's what needs to be done. Your head IS in the sand. Wake up and realize the problem and stop apologizing for whats going on and we can all help fix it.

Instead you want to play a victim card that no one wants to see.

Posted by Austin on 07/09/2014 at 7:31 AM

Re: “Your kid and my kid are not playing in the pros

I've been involved with competitive Irish dance since age 6, and have spend the majority of the past 12 years of my life at dance-related classes/competitions/performances/etc. all over the country. My parents have spent thousands of dollars and hours on my dance career, even though we all know I am not and will never be a world champion, or make it into the cast of Riverdance. We have never had delusions of grandeur, yet we did in fact orient our lives to (some extent) around dance anyway, and I would not trade it for the world. When I found I had a severe stress fracture, my first question was in fact, "how long until I can dance?", simply because dance is such a source of joy and purpose in my life. It has taught me discipline, determination, humility, perseverance, and balance (in more than just the physicality of pointe work). While I have witnessed my share of the "crazy" parents spoken of in this article, the vast majority of dance families I have met have traversed the world of competitive dance in a healthy, positive way. I very, very strongly believe that it is 100% possible, and not truly that difficult, for families to have a relationship with sports/other activities that is both competitive and healthy, both focused and beneficial. It just takes a little common sense.

Posted by Claire Kellen on 07/08/2014 at 10:54 PM

Re: “Better Block: Real time urban renewal

I'm not at all familiar with Indianapolis, so I don't know if Englewood has a corner store (or a few). I bring this up because corner stores can help a neighborhood be more of a neighborhood. It's hard to plan one in the sense that I'm thinking of (and I'm thinking of a specific although not unique one, a 35 second walk door-to-door from my house)- a place where people congregate. There are a number of "regulars" who spend time there everyday, but anyone can stop by anytime without arranging it in advance. This isn't the neighborhood where I grew up, and I'm shy, so unfortunately I don't know the regulars very well, but I've been going to the store in "my" neighborhood about a mile and a half away since I was 8 and feel like a regular there, even if it isn't as much of a gathering spot.
As I said, it's hard to plan that kind of social setting, but it might be something to consider for future events like Better Block.

Posted by Al Clark on 07/08/2014 at 9:50 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

Money will dictate the lt solution. If the people who come in and buy condos, eat at fancy restaurants, and spend at high-end retailers stop coming, either the village will go the way of Castleton or the developers/politicians will squeeze out the hip-hop (victim/scapegoat/culprit/however you view it). We are a young family in two of Indy's fastest growing companies and have had a gun pulled on us in broad daylight in BR. Our own patience gave out- we're looking to buy north, now. If people like us, people who actually spend money in the Village day AND night, start feeling like it's not worth it to play pioneer on the urban frontier, stuff's going to fall out the bottom fast. We'll still come visit, just like we have since we were teenagers, but the gun violence leaves us feeling like it's no longer smart to stay in the city, as bad as that sounds. Our children come first.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by frustratedbrmom on 07/08/2014 at 5:02 PM

Re: “Dodge City on the Central Canal

Here's a thought: How about the bars say NO GUNS, search everyone at the door, and kick out anybody with a gun? If they can't get into any of the bars it's a lot harder for them to get drunk enough to abandon all self-control and open fire over a bumped shoulder on a sidewalk.

Moreover, I'd like to see Broadripple policed by cops that aren't "off-duty" and collecting phone numbers of attractive co-eds while in uniform but working as private security guards on the payroll of local bars. Where were any of the half-dozen off-duty cops working in uniform as private security for the bars when this went down? Did any of them try to intervene or give pursuit? Why not?

Posted by Thorvington Finglethorpe on 07/08/2014 at 4:33 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

I didn't blame the police. I didn't blame the music. I suggested all parties involved need to reflect on why the neighborhood is attracting trouble and violence.

The article doesn't attempt to comment on why violence exists, or what drives people to hurt one another. And it seems abundantly obvious to me that the blame for the violence lays solely on the instigator.

But as someone who has worked in this area for around 5 years, and someone who has visited this neighborhood regularly for well over 20 years - I've closely observed how the neighborhood has changed through the years.

When the neighborhood was filled with independent entrepreneurs offering more cultural fare - the area was more peaceful. When cash-driven bar owners came in and turned the area into an enormous frat party with cops on every corner - the area became more violent.

You draw your conclusions, I'll draw mine. But I'm certainly not blaming the police.

4 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Kyle Long on 07/08/2014 at 4:18 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

This may very well be the most idiotic article I have seen yet on indy violence. Blame the police?? Social media blaming the rap music?? Of course it wasn't the music. You are taking the posts of 1 or 2 people who have no clue most likely and acting like that's typical thinking. The music doesn't shoot people. People shoot people. You at no point in your moronic article put any blame on the shooter or those who cause the trouble or asked who he was or why he did this and why those who know who he is are not coming forward. Instead you try to promote yourself as a DJ and blame the police. (yes we all know why you say LOW RENT DJs). Its the police and the sidewalks were where you laid the blame. And yes you did. No personal responsibility whatsoever or accountability for those who cause the trouble. I've seen the police harass people for touching fliers???? Are you kidding me? How in the hell does that correlate to the violence and 7 people getting shot?? Was this guy mad at the police when he shot?? No he's an horrible human being with no regard for human life and that is the problem and you in your infinite wisdom make no mention of this. This type of thinking and blaming of the sidewalks and police is the exact reason people think its ok to perpetuate the violence because people like you blame everyone they can but the actual people responsible. Nice work moron.

5 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by Accountable on 07/08/2014 at 2:55 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

I have been going to Ripple for years, and you always have issues when a bunch of drunk 20 somethings are running around. The problem is you have more ghetto element in Broad Ripple that just hangs out, talks shit, and tries to pick up drunk chicks. I go to the clubs that play rap, because I like the club music, and it does attract a more urban element, but it is the hood rats that just hang out that are giving Broad Ripple a more violent image. I do think that the sidewalks being to narrow for people to pass by without bumping into each other should be looked at. I am not small, and have trouble not elbowing people when it is busy. The only time you really have issues in Ripple is Fri. and Sat. nights from like 12-4. The rest of the time it is usually chill. You just have to figure out about 8 hours of the week.

5 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Big1jw on 07/07/2014 at 9:35 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

I'm gonna try to be as politically correct as I can here... But back in the day when Broad Ripple was considered "safe" every club didn't play rap music. They had live bands. Not to say rap music is a bad thing. But you have to consider the type of crowds your inviting. Gangsta rap will usually bring the "gangstas".
I'm usually the first person to fight stereotypes against music because I occasionally listen to heavy heavy bands (canibol corpes, anthrax, white zombie, Marilyn Manson, ect..). So on the other end of the spectrum... If Broadripple had a huge "Heavy Metal" scene and adolescent suicide was on the rise... I'd expect some backlash the way we need to do about rap scene....

7 likes, 14 dislikes
Posted by Ben Stacy on 07/07/2014 at 7:39 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

"B Ripple Local" raises some valid points around the loitering issue. Most of Indianapolis is starting to get behind the idea that city officials need to take a radical approach to curbing the rise in violence. Here's a radical idea: turn the kids on the sidewalk into the patrons that businesses so desperately need. Allow 18+ listeners into bars/venues that provide live music and entertainment (most of which do not allow weapons on the premises). It's as simple as a wristband. Provide huge tax incentives to all-ages venues. Give younger audiences wider access to cheap entertainment, and they're less likely to spend their time causing a nuisance. At best, an aggressive curfew and no loitering enforcement will force the criminals to a new destination. Until local leaders are willing to think outside the box and provide real, engaging alternatives to criminal behavior, the crime will stay.

9 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Rob Peoni on 07/07/2014 at 4:41 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

@ Kyle Long - The problem is those that loiter that have been pushed into Broad Ripple from downtown and other areas. I work downtown and have seen it first hand. You have to be realistic, idealism will not get you anywhere, you have to concede to the small steps to make progress. I have quite a history of community activism in my younger years. The police are not driving people to shoot at one another either. I feel like you are comparing apples and oranges. I will give to you though that some of the clientele are attracted by mindless binge drinking. Bar owners should be made to answer for that. The problem seems to be in the general area of 62nd St. between Guilford and College Ave. Maybe more scrutiny should be placed specifically on those businesses that cater to the late night crowd. I personally have found several other local friendly watering holes and the conversation of stay out of that area seems to come up more and more with every passing year. And unless the violence stops, a police state is the only certain outcome. When the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

7 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by B Ripple Local on 07/07/2014 at 4:40 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

@B Ripple Local - I never blamed the police. I'm just suggesting that everyone - including bar owners, bar patrons, police, & even homeowners - need to reflect on why & how the neighborhood devolved to this state.

Like you - I believe when a criminal act is committed it's the sole the fault of the perpetrator. But the community needs to ask why it's attracting criminal behavior, and bar owners need to create more thoughtful programming if they want to attract more thoughtful clientele.

As it stands I don't visit Broad Ripple unless I'm working there. Part of the reason for that is because I have encountered the misdirected frustration of the police when I've done nothing wrong. And I've heard others echo that concern. I'm not stating that to demonize police - I'm merely saying the police shouldn't target people who are trying to make the neighborhood a more vibrant, friendly, & liveable space.

And I'm glad you felt these thoughts reflected a sense of idealism. If there's no room for idealism within a conversation on public affairs - then we may as well live under a military dictatorship.

24 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Kyle Long on 07/07/2014 at 4:21 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

This reeks of self entitlement and idealism. Lets just ignore the problem and blame the police. If you don't want the police there, then behave yourself, and don't give them a reason to come around. Believe me I like to have fun, but am able to keep a low profile and be respectful to others. "I believe Broad Ripple thrives when it encourages visitors to congregate on its streets and engage one another socially." Please do not encourage this. This IS the problem. If you have no intention of patronizing businesses go home. To often the streets are full of people and the bars less than half full. As a homeowner in the area for the past 8 years, we do not need this. It just causes problems. It creates intoxicated people in tight spaces and a large amount of trash left behind, which honorable local citizens voluntarily clean up to maintain the integrity of the neighborhood. Also, shame on the bars that encourage overconsumption, your greed will be your end. NO MORE BARS IN BROAD RIPPLE.

11 likes, 21 dislikes
Posted by B Ripple Local on 07/07/2014 at 3:45 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

" While I can offer no solutions"

Then why are you writing a column about it?

17 likes, 19 dislikes
Posted by Bruce Bruce on 07/07/2014 at 2:49 PM

Re: “A Cultural Manifesto: Violence in Broad Ripple

Good on you for another article where you mention you're a DJ right away. Sweet way to advertise, if not douche-like.

17 likes, 29 dislikes
Posted by DJ Spamalot on 07/07/2014 at 1:58 PM

Re: “Racism in Indy's nightlife scene

Kyle, get over yourself.

1 like, 3 dislikes
Posted by PatriciaMartgerais on 07/06/2014 at 2:18 PM

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