Friday, August 16, 2013

Slideshow: Mass Ave Criterium 2013

Posted By on Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 10:44 AM

Slideshow
Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow)
Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow) Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow)

Mass Avenue Criterium 2013 (Slideshow)

Hundreds for cyclists and fans participated in this year's Mass Avenue Criterium. In addition to cycling events, there was a beer garden, and plenty of shopping venues for all. During this year's main event, 17 year old Gunner Dygert from team NUVO/Bissell brought home the main prize.

By Mark A. Lee

Click to View 15 slides

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Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Dispatch from the track: Grand Rapids

Posted By on Wed, Aug 1, 2012 at 3:00 PM

Bissell-ABG-NUVO Cycling wins big.
  • BISSELL-ABG-NUVO Cycling wins big.

BISSELL-ABG-NUVO director Declan Doyle checked in with us this week regarding his team's latest exploits. Here's the scoop:

"The team rode awesome last week at the Miller Energy Criterium in Grand Rapids, Mich., in front of a big crowd, going 1, 2, 3 and 7, 8. We had four in the break of 7, and Alex Wieseler won the field sprint. The announcer said we put on a bike racing clinic during our race, which BISSELL and company got to see.

"What people don't know about are the great friendships and how well this teams gels on and off the bike. This ship has turned around over the last four years, shrinking rival team TRH.

"Plus three kids have gotten to live their dreams, joining the pro team, and Alex Vanias is racing Tour of Utah next week, which is huge. He'll be on television.

"Definitely an up and coming team to keep an eye on.

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Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Slideshow: Indy Criterium 2012

Posted By on Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 10:00 AM

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Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium
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Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium

The .95-mile Indy Crit course, which traces a figure eight around University Park and through Monument Circle, challenged riders of all skill levels on a sweltering summer day.

By Brandon Knapp

Click to View 19 slides

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Monday, July 16, 2012

Bissell/ABG/NUVO's Brennen wins big at Indy Crit

Posted By on Mon, Jul 16, 2012 at 4:00 PM

Slideshow
Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium
Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium

Slideshow: 2012 Indy Criterium

The .95-mile Indy Crit course, which traces a figure eight around University Park and through Monument Circle, challenged riders of all skill levels on a sweltering summer day.

By Brandon Knapp

Click to View 19 slides

Both beer and water flowed on tap Saturday at University Park as the Indy Criterium welcomed hundreds of cyclists - and hundreds of fans who clanged cow-bells to cheer them on. The .95 mile figure-eight course around University Park and through Monument Circle challenged riders of all skill levels on a sweltering summer day.

Gourmet food trucks lined the streets and a wine and beer garden kept festival-goers happy as races went off on the hour. From tandem racing to juniors to Women's Category 1/2/3 and Men's Category 3/4, the Indy Criterium was a well-rounded event showcasing a variety of skill-levels in the Indy cycling world. The main event, Men's Category 1/2/3, went off last at 5:30 pm.

Eager to start, the racers in the top event crowded the start line, rushing to find a strategic place in the field. Their eagerness resulted in a mass-disregard for the staging line. The sassy announcer of the days events, Rachel Fagerberg, teased them "How many of you is this your first rodeo?" And then in response to blank stares from the racers added, "Yeah, I thought so. The race won't be won or lost at the start line, boys." With ten minutes to go until the race, officials urged the men to take a warm-up lap.

At five minutes to go, Fagerberg called up early registrants to their places at the front of the line. And in a mad-dash, the rest of the cyclists queued up behind them. General rules and notifications were laid down: $1500 to the first 15 places in the races, 3 "prems" at various points throughout the race, free lap rules, pace car rules and EMT locations. The adrenaline rose across the field as the officials stepped out of the way, ready to sound the bell.

The next 75 minutes were a whirl of excitement with early break-aways from Chad Burdzilaukas of Texas Road House Cycling and Declan Doyle of Bissell/ABG/NUVO, and counter-attacks from Greg Strock of Texas Roadhouse and Kyle Perry of Team Upland Brewing/Sustainable Cycling. The bunched-up field of racers conserved their energy throughout the first half of the race, as attacks and counter-attacks pushed riders up and down the field.

With about 25 minutes to go, 17 riders made their move, widening the field between the money and the rest. Throughout the last dozen and a half laps, the money held on, as the front of the pack raced to ensure a top 15 finish.

It was the last $50 prem called that decided the race for Mac Brennen of Bissell/ABG/NUVO, who attacked out of the group. "I ended up having a huge gap. So I decided to just go with it. I just tried to keep it steady and maintain my effort," Brennen later said.

And maintain his effort he did, as he held a significant and steady led through the end of the race. His worked paid off, and he took first place in the big race of the day.

"This is a super big event," said Brennen as he stepped off the podium, drenched in sweat and champagne, "so its always good to win at the big events. And the field was really strong. And especially being in the hometown and NUVO, it was good to win in front of the sponsors and the hometown."

Chad Burdzilaukas, Texas Road House Cycling, took second, and Nikolai Brokovich, from Denmark, placed third.

Congrats to all who competed. Here is a list of other big winners throughout the day.

1st Men's Category 4/5 Race
1. Ed Dyer of UCSD, San Diego, California
2. Scott Baumer of Indiebike.com/Angie's List, Indianapolis
3. Edward Wimmer of Darkhorse Racing, Northern Kentucky

Women's Category 1/2/3 Race
1. Bri Clark of Racing for Riley, Indianapolis
2. Katie Arnold of Racing for Riley, Indianapolis
3. Emily Flanigan of TREK Bicycles, St. Louis, Missouri

2nd Men's Category 4/5 Race
1. Chris Dawson of Westfield, Ind.
2. Andrew Zens of Rhythm Racing, Chicago
3. Robert Annis of Nebo Ridge Racing, Indianapolis

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Monday, April 30, 2012

Cycling: Team Bissell/ABG/NUVO rules at JMSR

Posted By on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 at 1:46 PM

All five Bissel/ABG/NUVO racers finished in the top 18.
  • All five Bissell/ABG/NUVO racers finished in the top 18.

After sweeping the podium at Hillsboro Roubaix two weeks ago, Bissell-ABG-NUVO cycling team was a little worried that that the team wouldn't top that.

Well, they did.

Alex Vanias won the overall (category 1-2) at the Joe Martin Stage Race in Fayetteville, Arizona. Vanias placed second in the opening stage, a 4km uphill grind, just seconds behind first. The rest of the team, Jon Jacob, Nate Williams, Weston Luzadder and Mac Brennan, placed themselves solidly in the top-20 which gave the team many options for the remaining three stages.

In the stage two road race Vanias made a crucial split near the finish and moved into the yellow jersey! This stage also allowed Jon Jacob to move into fifth overall and Williams into 12th.

The third stage provided a perfect opportunity for the team to practice defending a GC position.

The boys put two riders into an early breakaway which forced the other teams to chase, allowing Vanias an easy ride to the finish for another successful day in yellow. Vanias and the team made the final criterium stage a formality as Luzadder finished fifth on the stage and Vanias took a fantastic stage race win with support of all his teammates.

This result speaks to the depth of talent on the Bissell-ABG-NUVO team. All five team members finished in the top 18, including Jacob in fifth, Williams in 11th, Mac Brennan in 17th, and Luzadder in 18th.

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Thursday, April 19, 2012

Slideshow: 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic

Posted By on Thu, Apr 19, 2012 at 10:30 AM

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11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow)
11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow) 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow) 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow) 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow) 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow) 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow) 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow)

11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic (Slideshow)

The Bissell/ABG/NUVO team swept the podium at the 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic on April 14.

By Brandon Knapp

Click to View 8 slides

The Bissell/ABG/NUVO team swept the podium at the 11th Annual Hillsboro Roubaix Spring Classic on April 14; the race is contested on rural roads in Illinois just outside of St. Louis.

In the racing season's first big competition, 100 riders lined up for an 86 mile race on flat, open, rolling roads with no break from the spring winds. Challenges included short, steep climbs, twisting descents and village streets paved with bricks. The Bissell/ABG/NUVO team made a clear statement by securing all three podium positions.

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Monday, April 9, 2012

Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride

Posted By on Mon, Apr 9, 2012 at 2:01 PM

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Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride
Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride

Slideshow: Mayor's Spring Fever Bike Ride

On April 7, a few hundred bicyclers gathered at Broad Ripple Park, then rode for 11 miles to enjoy the day and celebrate the ever expanding bike lanes.

By Jim Poyser

Click to View 10 slides

On Saturday, April 7, a few hundred bicyclers gathered at Broad Ripple Park, then rode for 11 miles to enjoy the day and celebrate the ever expanding bike lanes.

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Friday, April 6, 2012

The Bicycle Diaries of a Big Girl: Not easy being green

Posted By on Fri, Apr 6, 2012 at 8:36 AM

Coyne and her little frog legs.
  • Coyne and her little frog legs.

This is part of a series of stories about Katelyn Coyne's foray into the realm of commuter bicycling.

"It's not easy being green." The old adage from Kermit T. Frog seems ever relevant these days. Devoting oneself to sustainable living takes careful planning and execution. It adds time to your already hectic day, to the point where it seems better to just not try.

But the recent re-launch of Indiana Living Green, and the magazine's "no-waste" party at City Market last Saturday got me thinking: How difficult is it, really? One of my favorite new series on ILG is Jim Poyser's "Doom & Bloom." In one article, this consummate commuter cyclist writes about his experience coasting through Indy by bike, drawing attention to motorists whose mode of transportation flies in the face of his own efforts.

"Every day," he writes, "I wait at a major intersection - Meridian Street - and count the number of cars heading downtown, going to work. The other day I counted 14 cars with a single occupant, before a car with a passenger went by. On average, 90% of cars have one occupant."

Relative to Mr. Poyser, I'm an infant when it comes to cycling. He can step up to preach because he practices green living in some way every day. Despite my best efforts during the past month, I haven't been able to wean myself off of the juicy teet we call oil dependence. My dirty little secret: I've still been driving. What's worse, I've been driving to places which I could easily bike. But the thought of how easy it is to cut my carbon emissions in half simply by offering a ride to a friend stuck with me.

So I decided, this week, to make living green an active priority. If I was traveling alone, it would be by bike.

Like a kind of magic, the city of Indianapolis opened up for me. I biked to get my taxes done. I biked the Canal to my part-time job at the Eiteljorg. I biked to the grocery, to the bank, to rehearsal. I biked to Flying Cupcake, to City Market, to the Pita Pit. I even biked up to National Moto in SoBro.

I found a sense of empowerment in the thought that the power to get from "A" to "B" exists within me. It hit me when I was pulling around the corner of 11th and Emerson to visit a friend on the Eastside. My memory placed the image of his house in my muscles, but my memory had me sitting in a car. For an instant, my body's reality of being upright on a bike clashed with my muscle memory. And I felt elation, accomplishment... transcendence even.

But how long does that power last?

After a day of riding downtown, taking pictures for a one of my other jobs, I was beat. My poor little frog legs had given out as I cycled up College on my way home for a pre-rehearsal snack. I still had to make it to all the way to the Indianapolis Museum of Art, after rehearsal was moved from East 10th Street to the museum. My knees buckled as I dragged my bike up three flights of stairs, and collapsed in the middle of the kitchen floor. No way could I make the trek north and then south again after dark.

I reluctantly got in my car... alone. To make matters worse, I found out when I arrived that I could have carpooled with a fellow cast member. If only I had the forethought.

In the end, I was defeated by my own lack of planning and my own lack of stamina. Both of which take time to increase. But one defeat doesn't make me a failure. As Winston Churchill said, "True success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." I find it applicable for all of us, who - with the best intentions - fail at living green. As long as I get on my bike the next day to ride, I'm still doing my part.

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Friday, March 30, 2012

The Bicycle Diaries of a Big Girl: A mentor

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 6:00 AM

Katelyn and Patrick McCarney pause along their journey.
  • Katelyn and Patrick McCarney pause along their journey.

This is part of a series of stories about Katelyn Coyne's foray into the realm of commuter bicycling.

Last week, Geneva Bohlander, who refers to herself as a kindred spirit in the learning process, left this encouraging comment on my blog: "I have a friend. I call him KING OF BIKE, and he is very helpful and encouraging! Willing to answer my millions of questions. Hope you have such a person too!"

Geneva's right; I need a mentor. My obvious choice: my brother Brendan, who is a former Olympic-level swimmer who now completes triathlons in the Rocky Mountains (as a hobby). But since he was unwilling to leave his pregnant wife and drive eighteen hours just to ride with his kid sister up the Monon Trail, I found the next best thing.

When my friend, Patrick McCarney, took up cycling last summer, I found it very inspiring. He would show up late to the shindigs our friends threw in his backyard. We'd all be well-lubricated and roasting marshmallows on the fire by the time Pat arrived around dusk, sporting a yellow jersey soaked in sweat. Over the course of the summer, we watched our slightly-pudgy-yet-ever-adorable friend become a svelte cyclist.

I asked Pat if he would ride with me and teach me some cycling etiquette. We began our trek north to Broad Ripple at the mouth of the Monon, where it intersects the Cultural Trail downtown.

The ride

As we pedal along, I realize this is no leisure ride. Not for me anyhow. Pat's going fast, but I'm barely keeping up. After passing a family with a stroller and a dog in tow, Pat notices my hesitation and takes the lead.

"My first piece of advice is using your judgment on when to call out when you're passing someone. After a while, you can judge by what a person is doing [on the trail] if they need a warning." said Pat after we pass the family. "For instance, back there: I always worry about dogs and strollers."

Who knew that babies and puppies could be a bicyclist's biggest nemesis?

Breathing heavily, I tell him, "I just can't project well enough to be heard while I'm cycling." But he assures me that I can do it, and it's important.

Later he has me take the lead. As I tentatively call out, "On your left," a pair of ladies step politely out of the way. I turn back to Pat with the grin of a proud five-year-old, "Did you see that? They heard me!"

"I heard you from back here." he smiles. "Your voice carries further than you think."

Note: After writing this blog, Jim Poyser informed me that, according to Indiana code, "A person may not ride a bicycle unless the bicycle is equipped with a bell or other device capable of giving a signal audible for a distance of at least one hundred (100) feet." I guess two bike gurus are better than one. And I guess I have some more shopping to do, too!

Making passes

I continue to lead, but seem to keep leaving Pat in my dust. I must be really good, right? But I remember: this is an opportunity for growth not for hubris.

"Feel free to critique when I'm doing something wrong," I tell him.

He pauses a moment, his silence tells me - yes, I am doing something very wrong - then he says, "It's important to give people more room when you pass. And, when you're riding in groups, to communicate when you make the move. Like these people up here... solidly take the other lane. You want to be further away."

Growing up in the Deep South, politeness was practically beaten into me. But in the cycling world, I've got to work on my manners. Stop weaving through pedestrian traffic, check. Remember my bicycle buddy behind me, check. I follow his lead as he uses hand signals that cue me to slow. In tandem, we sail past the next group of runners, and in 25 short minutes, we arrive at Broad Ripple, much faster than when I did the trek myself last week.

I'm eager to continue on; Pat suggests we keep going until 86th Street.

The reward after a long ride.
  • The reward after a long ride.

We successfully make it to our destination, but not before a cyclist curtly yells at me to "get out of the way!" I absent-mindedly crossed the red line that divides the Monon. With 86th Street in sight, I jump off my bike signaling to Pat I can go no further without a water break.

As my "King of Bikes," Pat makes a generous effort to correct and simultaneously reassure me, after I am made tiny by the comment.

"As long as you're on this side of the red line, you're fine. Then they have nothing to complain about. I find cyclists to be more pushy than they need to be."

"I can understand why though," I say, "If I saw someone breaking the rules, I'd probably be pissy too."

"The cyclists who are the most vocal on the Monon are the most experienced," he explains. "In a way that makes sense, but the Monon is for everyone. You have people of all skill levels at running, biking, walking. I've always believed that, as a cyclist, you're personally responsible for your own safety. But a lot of [cyclists] get vocal on principal because they feel like their rights are being violated. The thing is, those people who yell are the same people who go way too fast for what the Monon allows with all its traffic. It's unfair to yourself and everyone else on the trail to have the expectation that everyone's going to get out of your way."

His reassurance energizes me to continue and we head back on the trail. But before heading home, we make another pit stop at Broad Ripple Brewpub so I can accomplish one of my checklist items: cycling to this bike-hub-pub to enjoy a cold brew. As I sip the pale ale and he enjoys the lager, I ask Pat the question I've been waiting to pop all afternoon

"Will you be my bike guru?"

"I'm no expert," he says, "but I'm happy to help" - an attitude held by most cyclists in Indy, and one that makes joining this community so gratifying. After our single pints, we sail home from Broad Ripple, and I notice I'm controlling my stops and passes better. I'm reading Pat's body language more efficiently, and I'm already more confident on the trail. Maybe it's the beer, or maybe it's my guru.

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Friday, March 23, 2012

The Bicycle Diaries of a Big Girl: A week of firsts

Posted By on Fri, Mar 23, 2012 at 11:00 AM

Katelyn Coyne bicycles
This is second in a series of stories about Katelyn Coyne's foray into the realm of commuter bicycling.

I don't know how many of you are friends with my mom on Facebook, but here is what she had to say about the launch of this blog last week:

"Katelyn is starting a blog on what it takes to go from car commuter to cyclist...This should be historical and hysterical! This is the girl who could not walk into a room without hitting a wall. Who couldn't get through a meal without spilling the milk. And who, when we lived in Paris, Illinois-- a small town with no traffic-- managed to fall off the bicycle we had and got scrapped from head to toe and on her front and back, at the same time. Well if you saw her after falling, you might be nervous about her too!" --Peggy Coyne

What are mothers for if not to air your dirty laundry on the social network? Thanks for ripping me, Peggy. But I have to admit, she has a point. I'm not the most coordinated person in the world. In fact, I'll bet I'm one of the least. It is true, I wrecked a bike in small-town Illinois and went to the emergency room. But, whatever, I took a turn too quickly and those scars on my knees make me look like a BAMF. Albeit, a bad-ass that can't wear shorts without scaring small children.

In honor of my mother, who watched me experience a lot of firsts, here is a selection of firsts as a Big Girl Bicyclist:

1.) My first trip up the Monon. As serious cyclists in their yellow jerseys glided by me, I felt inspired to keep pushing. Then I arrived at Indy's cycling mecca: Broad Ripple. A sense of accomplishment overwhelmed me as I walked into McDonald's to get a water.

But suddenly I felt sick. Maybe it was the smell of Filet-O-Fish. Or maybe it was the thought of pedaling my ass back to 13th Street. Had I pushed myself too far, too soon? Pride kept me from calling my boyfriend for a ride home, so I mounted my bike and began my trek.

My knees, thighs, butt and hands felt numb, but I'm happy to report I made it back. My secret: dreaming of chicken wings and bleu cheese dressing as I rode.

"Dammit," I thought, "if I make it home, I deserve a huge order of buffalo wings." A Big Girl Delight (BGD for short) is the best, and sometimes only way, to motivate a Big Girl.

2.) The first time a bug flew in my mouth.

3.) The first time I spit from a moving bicycle.

4.) The first time I thought I would projectile vomit from a moving bicycle.

5.) First battle wounds.

5a.) My pedal took a chunk out of my left shin. To add embarrassment to injury, I was completely stationary when it happened. I guess my lack of coordination will always supply fodder for friends and family.

5b.) I also pulled a muscle in my right thigh. I was whining among friends: "I'm not a fit lady!" Which resulted in a great piece of encouragement and advice from one Georgeanna Smith. She reminded me that "everyone regardless of athletic ability gets injuries like that. It happens to the best of them." No pain no gain is legit, ya'll.

6.) First time commuting by bike: to rehearsal and to run errands. The problem: Now I turn up places sweaty, gross and totally unapproachable for at least ten minutes. After a short cool down period, Super-Awkward Katelyn reverts back to the mild mannered and slightly less awkward Katelyn.

7.) First time I almost got hit by a car. I think it was my fault, but it could have been theirs. Luckily, it doesn't matter because I was not hit and have since invested in a helmet. (I got one that matches my shoes.) This does, however, remind me of a cyclist I saw laying in the road on Meridian and Tenth the other day. He had been hit by a car, and it looked like he broke his leg. Please, please to all my motorist friends out there: be cautious of cyclists. Their numbers will only grow as the weather warms up. And if they get hit, chances are it will be your fault.

And finally, 8.) The first of my (soon to be widely acclaimed) series about bicycles was published. You are currently enjoying the second installment, so your congratulations are a bit belated. But I accept them graciously nonetheless.

And I will also graciously accept any and all of your comments, suggestions, questions, etc. Let me know if I've said something inaccurate or if you have solid bicycle information to share.

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Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Big news for NUVO Cycling

Posted By on Wed, Nov 2, 2011 at 4:00 PM

NUVO Cycling
  • Joe Vondersaar
  • NUVO Cyclist Jonathan Jacob racing at the Broad Ripple Crit. Jacobs remains with the NUVO team, now merged with Bissell.

For the past several months, the NUVO Cultural Trail cycling team has been gaining new riders. It has seemed as though they were amassing a whole new army. And, well, they were. The announcement comes today that the Bissell Masters/Elite cycling team and the NUVO Cultural Trail cycling team will be merging into one single USA Cycling NRC Amateur team for 2012 and beyond.

This means several things. Bissell Pro Cycling has agreed to take at least two riders from the amateur team to race as professionals during the final months of the 2012 season.

Bissell and Advantage Benefits have now committed to an amateur development team that will bridge the gap between grassroots racing and the pro ranks.

Advantage Benefits CEO and key sponsor of the BISSELL Pro Cycling team, Robert Hughes, commented: "One of the reasons we started the Pro team years ago was to give young and upcoming Michigan riders a chance to take the next step, this new affiliation allows even more opportunity for those riders and we are excited by the new young talent on the team. Hopefully we identify and develop another Brent Bookwalter." Hughes and Advantage Benefits sponsored Bookwalter early in his career and now races at the sport's highest professional level.

NUVO Cycling Team Director Declan Doyle had the following to say about the merger: “We’ve already proven we can develop young talent from Indiana and beyond. We’re the ones who plucked Eric Young from the Little 500 in Bloomington and helped him join the Bissell pro team. Now he’s pro national champ. By officially working with Bissell’s pro team, we can do for other young riders what we’ve done for Eric. I am very excited.”

The team has also committed to donating all of its prize money from two team events to World Bicycle Relief. World Bicycle Relief changes lives by purchasing bicycles for individuals in developing nations who cannot afford them, thus giving them life-changing mobility and freedom.

BISSELL-ABG-NUVO will use a group of experienced racers to provide leadership and mentoring to the team’s young superstars. This exciting merger results from the collaboration between NUVO Team Director, Declan Doyle and Bissell Masters racer, Derek Witte, both of whom will assist with team management during 2012. Aaron Hubbell, himself a former National champion and elite track rider, will round out the management team.

New riders for 2012 include:

• Mac Brennan, 21, East Jordan MI
• Josh Johnson, 19, Ft. Wayne, IN
• Weston Luzadder, 21, Indianapolis, IN
• Alex Vanias, 21, Leroy, MI
• Alexey Vermeulen, 18, Ann Arbor, MI
• Alex Wieseler, 22, Indianapolis, IN
• Jason Fowler, 29, Indianapolis, IN
• Scott Catanzaro, 23, Indianapolis, IN
• Kevin Depasse, 21, Bloomington, IN

Returning riders include:

• Neal Forbes, 19, Indianapolis, IN
• Derek Graham, 31, Grand Rapids MI
• Jon Jacob, 32, Evansville IN
• Joe Kukolla, 23, Indianapolis IN
• Daniel Lam, 37, Kalamazoo, Michigan
• Andrew Otte, 28, West Lafayette IN
• Brad Schaeffer, 30, Indianapolis, IN
• Nate Williams, 30, Grand Rapids MI

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Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Slideshow: Tour de Coops vol. 2

Posted By on Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 11:45 AM

Slideshow
Tour de Coops vol. 2 (Slideshow)
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Tour de Coops vol. 2 (Slideshow)

More photos from Sunday's Tour de Coops, during which more than 600 people - most on bike - gathered at Broad Ripple Park and ventured forth in the surrounding neighborhoods to check out 14 backyard chicken coops and their denizens while raising more than $4,000 for Keep Indianapolis Beautiful and IndyCog.

By April Schmid

Click to View 15 slides

More photos from Sunday's Tour de Coops, during which 600 people - most on bike - gathered at Broad Ripple Park and ventured forth in the surrounding neighborhoods to check out 14 backyard chicken coops and their denizens.

Tour de Coops was presented by Nap Town Chickens. Five-dollar donations from each tourist, t-shirt sales and raffles amounted to more than $4,000 raised for Keep Indianapolis Beautiful and IndyCog.

The event was surprisingly popular, according to Andrew Brake of Keep Indianapolis Beautiful. "When we first came up with this idea, we were thinking we might get 50 or so participants and be lucky to break even. We either got really lucky or urban chicken farming combined with bike riding is immensely popular in Indianapolis."

Check out the first Tour de Coops slideshow here.

And if you missed the tour, have hope: "Based on the number of requests for this to be an annual event, we've already started thinking about next year," Brake says. "Coop owners have been contacting us to be on the tour for next year and participants want to buy tickets in advance."
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