Environment

Friday, February 3, 2012

In Memoriam: Donovan Miller

Posted By on Fri, Feb 3, 2012 at 8:30 AM

Donovan Miller
  • Donovan Miller

Donovan Miller, the 2011 winner of Hoosier Environmental Council’s award for Land Steward of the Year, passed away on Thursday, Feb. 2.

He was diagnosed last July with inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma.

Over a decade ago, Miller took early retirement from his career as an administrator, turning his attention to his love of nature — as a gardener, landscaper and lover of the earth.

The Land Steward of the Year award recognized Miller for his various volunteer efforts throughout the city. Hoosier Environmental Council’s Tim Maloney presented the award, citing projects such as the one at the Indiana State Museum, “where he conceived of a multi-year restoration project to return the Turner Gardens to Indiana native prairie.”

Other projects spearheaded by Miller included being chief gardener and caretaker of the greenhouse at Cold Spring School, part of that school's environmental studies magnet program.

Said Maloney, “He has tended a tract of forest for Central Indiana Land Trust; takes student groups on rafting trips with Friends of the White River; done a lot of work to remove invasive species and led student tours at Marian University EcoLab. He has also spearheaded the Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society's Letha's Youth Outdoors Fund, which helps school children experience nature in an educational context."

Donovan and I were neighbors for about a decade. I lived next to him during the period where he was still dressing up in a suit each day, driving to work, dreaming of a time when he could spend his days with his hands in the dirt.

Donovan was the best neighbor a person could have. Our two sons were born when we lived next door, which means they grew from babies to toddlers to rambunctious youngsters.

My sons’ occasional destructiveness extended to Donovan’s yard where on at least one occasion, his garden was damaged. There was also the period — unknown to me until much later — when my sons were ringing his doorbell, then running away.

Donovan tolerated it all with his gentle manner and a wry smile. He’d had two kids himself, so he knew parenting wasn’t simple.

One day in particular he knew how complex it could be.

Our youngest son, William, was about three years old when he decided to visit the corner candy store a good hundred yards away — on his own. We’d taken him there many times, and it didn’t occur to him he couldn’t go by himself, so he slipped out the door, unbeknownst to us, and headed to Friendly Foods.

I doubt he had any money with him — for all he knew Friendly Foods was that friendly. Hey, kid, just pick out your candy and go!

I don’t think William actually made it into the store that day. I do know that Donovan happened to be driving by at that very moment.

He told me later that when he saw William he thought to himself, “Whoa, that child is WAY too young to be out and about on his own.” His next thought, taking a closer look, was, “Whoa, I know that kid. It’s William!”

He proceeded to pick William up and take him to our home.

Imagining the alternatives to that scenario always makes me shudder. No matter what, it would have been a pretty bad day for William, and probably for the rest of us as well. Instead, my son was taken home, safe and sound.

Donovan was my hero that day, and remained so to the end.

When he learned of his diagnosis, he did something extraordinary.

He invited his friends over to his house to meet each other. Over the course of a couple gatherings, we did indeed meet each other — first a dozen of us, then two dozen, then more, gathering around a small fire in his backyard, swapping tales and singing, celebrating the life of Donovan right there in front of him.

We supposedly live in an age when people are sequestered in their individual homes, surrounded by entertainment systems; that their sense of community is merely Facebook-based.

I am here to tell you it’s not true. That I lived next door to a generous and loving man named Donovan Miller.

His life lives on in the ecosystems and communities he helped nourish into being.

A memorial service will be at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 5, at First Mennonite Church, 4601 Knollton Road.

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Tuesday, January 24, 2012

KIB gets Lilly grant

Posted By on Tue, Jan 24, 2012 at 1:30 PM

KIB works with more than 40,000 annually on over 500 community improvement projects all over the city.
  • KIB works with more than 40,000 annually on over 500 community improvement projects all over the city.

Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, Inc. (KIB) announced today it has received a $325,000 grant from Lilly Endowment Inc. to continue community greening.

KIB is a private, nonprofit organization bringing people together to “build community and transform public spaces” through programs involving youth employment, urban forestry, volunteer engagement, education, and community beautification. In 2011, KIB worked with over 46,000 volunteers on more than 600 projects.

The grant will make KIB capable of extending its mission within six major program areas: IPL Project GreenSpace, KIB Clubs, NeighborWoods, Youth Tree Team, Great Indy Clean Up and Adopt-a-Block.

Each of the programs offers its own unique focus on guidance and assistance in improving the local environment. Volunteers will participate in planting trees, creating gardens, enhancing greenspaces and eliminating litter among other actions while connecting community members with their neighbors and encouraging investment in their neighborhoods.

KIB Clubs is their youth program, which offers hands-on environmental learning with instilling the understanding of conservation and an appreciation for our natural habitat in mind. Trained teachers within 12 schools will work with kids regularly on projects.

For more information on KIB’s efforts and programs, visit here or follow KIB on twitter at @kibiorg.

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Friday, November 18, 2011

IU prof presents carbon cycle PowerPoint

Posted By on Fri, Nov 18, 2011 at 11:45 AM

Faiz Rahman is a professor in the Department of Geology at Indiana University, Bloomington.
  • Faiz Rahman is a professor in the Department of Geology at Indiana University, Bloomington.

At The Indianapolis Public Library on Wednesday night, IU-Bloomington Geology professor Faiz Rahman presented illuminating stats regarding climate change and the carbon cycle, including carbon’s impact on our own Indiana environment.

At the same time, he unveiled brand new mapping technology that tracks carbon uptake and carbon emissions on a district-to-district basis in Indiana.

Rahman’s presentation was part of a now completed, four-public library tour, including Bedford, Bloomington and Nashville, an impressive effort to show the public what Indiana University’s research is revealing about our climate.

A total of nine audience members attended.

Dr. Rahman told the assembled handful that the research, whose partners include NASA, Department of Energy and Indiana’s DNR, is centered at Morgan Monroe State Forest, where a sensor tower, along with ground level experiments and a small airplane with sensors, are tracking the forest’s ability to sequester carbon.

The goal: understand Indiana carbon cycle, extrapolating those findings out into the entire planet.

Over a twelve-year period, researchers, including Rahman, have determined that the ability of these Indiana forests to sink carbon is in fact improving — i.e. carbon uptake is increasing. On the face of it, Rahman said, this might seem like good news. After all, carbon sequestered in forests and oceans keeps CO2 out of the air, where it contributes to global warming.

However, Rahman made it clear the forest’s improved ability to sink carbon is due to the fact that Indiana temperatures are rising steadily, and autumn is falling later. In fact, autumn, on average, is arriving a full 20 days later than it did 20 years ago.

You could have heard a pin drop in the room, had the floor been made of wood instead of carpet.

A change in climate this obvious and disruptive should cause alarm — if not downright panic — and inspire a concomitant change in fossil fuel consumption.

Rahman wants this research made available to Indiana politicians to factor into their decision-making when it comes to environmental regulations, invitation to new business, considering mass transit, etc.

However, Rahman was adamant in asserting that scientists are not in a position of making policy themselves.

While this attendee admired the scientist’s restraint and neutrality, it was, nevertheless, frustrating beyond words, because if you can actually see seasons changing by as much as one day per year, then we are obviously on the cusp of enormous climate upheaval. This past year’s extreme weather events is just a taste of the fun to come.

Waiting around for politicians to do the right thing for the environment — i.e. champion clean, renewable energy legislation, quickly phase out coal, prosecute polluters to the fullest extent, etc. — seems like fool’s game as Indiana politicians have a long history of placing nature down the list of priorities, somewhere below subsidizing the purchase of spats for Hoosier marching bands.

We cannot wait for them to do the right thing — we must insist that they do the right thing, based on the evidence that is not just clear, but blatantly obvious.

Rahman’s said this research will be presented to politicians at the Statehouse in February (presumably, Conservation Day). People who care about survival — i.e. not just environmentalists — should be in attendance as well, to support the earth by demanding that stewardship of the environment comes first.

Jim Poyser is the newly named editor of Indiana Living Green. He is struggling in his quest to figure out how to communicate about the alarming threats to our environment. Let him know if he failed or succeeded in this post by posting a comment or emailing him at jpoyser@nuvo.net.

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Monday, November 7, 2011

From Crossroads to Capitol: a protest journey

Posted By on Mon, Nov 7, 2011 at 12:30 PM

Slideshow
From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow)
From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow) From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow)

From Crossroads to Capitol (Slideshow)

Over 100 Hoosiers descended on Washington D.C. to protest the construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

By Christina Kratzner

Click to View 11 slides



A protestor makes her feelings clear at last weekends action in D.C.
  • A protestor makes her feelings clear at last weekend's action in D.C.

It feels a little bit like a field trip. The bus is full of rowdy students, with a few quiet older folks sitting in the front. People are singing, horsing around, couples are cuddling and someone puts Men in Black in the DVD player.

But the energy here isn’t about a class trip to Cedar Point, it’s about more than 100 Bloomington community members joining together to travel to Washington, D.C. in an attempt to help circle the White House.

The circle is supposed to show President Obama how many U.S. citizens want him to say no to the Keystone XL Pipeline, a pipeline that would carry tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada through six states to the Gulf of Texas for refinement and shipping.

There are over 100 Hoosiers on the two buses leaving from Bloomington with a third bus leaving from Rochester, IN. While waiting for the buses to arrive we wait at People’s Park, the site of Occupy Bloomington, where we are offered good wishes, food and books for the journey. We are cheered on in the fashion of the “People’s Mic” with dances and songs.

We are the 100 making the trip, but we are leaving behind more than that number who are with us in spirit.

On the bus we talk about the protest. It is a serious action, we’re told. We aren’t there to make trouble. We are there to peacefully engage the President. We have to be careful not to ruin it for everyone else.

After we talk about rules and other protest actions people have been involved with — a few people here were arrested in August as part of this movement — the rowdiness resumes.

This is the kind of enthusiasm the supporters who sent us off in such style wanted. Well, at least most of it is. Some people are joking about buying alcohol in Ohio (it’s Sunday morning by now) but many want to sing protest songs and talk about the tar sands as we leave behind what one woman on the bus claimed is the second most polluted state in the country.

Twelve thousand protestors

Twelve thousand people. The circle around the White House is three, four and five people deep in some parts. If the Occupy movement has been criticized for having hard-to-define goals, this movement is the opposite. One goal. One man to reach. And the message is simple: Keep your promises.

Most of the signs hoisted high at the rally and in the circle are simple quotes. Obama’s own words blown up on placards and waved in his direction. “Change you can believe in,” Obama said, and these people did.

“I want to make sure the planet is as beautiful for my daughters as it was for me.” “Let us be the generation that makes future generations proud of what we did here.” “Let’s be the generation that finally frees America from the tyranny of oil.” “Unchecked, climate change will pose unacceptable risks to our security, our economies, and our planet.”

Sarah Hodgdon, an Indiana University alum is now the conservation director at the Sierra Club, says that the Keystone pipeline is the proverbial line in the sand. “If the tar sands continue to be extracted and burned we won’t be able to turn it around.” And that’s not just a Sierra Club opinion — the information came from a study done by NASA scientist James Hanson.

The fact that the planet would not recover from this action is why Hodgdon says this is as important to Hoosiers as to people who live in Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas — the states the pipeline will run through if approved.

And Hoosiers do care, clearly, The long-term numbers are the ones B-town residents here are talking about. Alex Burgan is not interested in how many jobs will be created because those jobs, she says, will be temporary. And she thinks the money that would be used for the pipeline could be better used in alternative energy. “Oil is going to run out,” she said.

Emily Dingman helped plan the trip, and her interest is in water quality. She says it will take over thee million gallons of water every day to transport the tar sands oil through the pipeline — water that will be so contaminated it cannot be used again. She calls it, “a massive waste of a life sustaining resource.”

David Haberman, religious studies professor at Indiana University, is not interested in the amount of oil that will be extracted, he’s concerned about the amount of forest that will be destroyed — an area he says is the same size as England.

The protest begins with a rally. We hear from James Hanson, the scientist Hodgdon quoted. Speeches are aimed at the protesters and at Obama himself. They talk about bi-partisan cooperation (which makes one person in the crowd so angry he starts yelling and walks away to rejoin the marchers later). The talking goes on long enough that people get antsy — everyone here is ready to get to the main event.

So the walking begins. The people gathered in the park split off in two directions to meet in the middle, singing and chanting the entire time. When everyone meets in front of the White House, there are three separate lines to accommodate everyone. They link hands and continue the chanting (and in the case of the Bloomington contingent, do a little dancing).

This is it. The line stays here for about 15 minutes before heading back to the park, hoping to make their point simply by showing up.

According to the protesters, this is what democracy looks like — and Obama should agree. Let me end with more of his own words. “Change doesn’t come from Washington, change comes to Washington.”

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Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 9:00 AM

This week's Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) brought to you by Michael and Jim, the ApocaDocs.

Check out their free book: "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies"

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This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What did a study find regarding organic poultry farms?

a. Their chickens are less neurotic.
b. Their chickens are more neurotic.
c. They have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
d. They are far more productive.
e. They are not so organic as they appear!

2. How did fans at a Nebraska Cornhuskers game react to a Keystone XL
pipeline company logo displayed on the stadium screen?

a. They went stone silent.
b. They did the "wave."
c. They did the "pipe."
d. They booed.
e. They cheered.

3. What did scientists find for the first time in pigs in Africa?

a. Little pigs
b. WIngs
c. Swine flu
d. MRSA
e. Avian flu

4. What is single-handedly blocking federal legislation to strengthen safety rules for oil and gas pipelines?

a. The son of Ron Paul.
b. Rand Paul
c. An idiotic senator from Kentucky.
d. All of these answers are true.
e. A tea party darling.

5. What is the city of Shanghai struggling to do?

a. Stay above sea level.
b. Secede.
c. Go green!
d. Continue kidnapping people efficiently.
e. Cut its China emissions.

6. What eco-friendly business is thriving in Beaverton, Oregon?

a. A beaver pelt store.
b. A dentist.
c. A bike shop.
d. A steel mill.
e. A gas station

7. What does a new study say about Arctic ice shelves?

a. Their demise are harbingers of global warming.
b. Disintegrating ice shelves produce roving icebergs.
c. They are disappearing.
d. All of these answers are horrifyingly true.
e. Their disappearance reduces microbial life habitat.

Continue reading »

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Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Tue, Sep 27, 2011 at 11:15 AM

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The ApocaDocs, Jim and Michael, present the Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) for the week beginning Monday, Sept. 19, to test your knowledge of current environmental news.

Get the Free Book, "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies."

This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What does a 20 year University of Florida study say Florida leads the world in?
a. Invasive species
b. Floridians
c. Sea level rise threat
d. Snowbirds
e. BPA contamination

2. What did a French study find happened to fish downstream from a pharmaceutical plant?
a. They were asexual.
b. They were easy.
c. They were metrosexual.
d. They were tastier.
e. They were intersex.

3. Where do climate scientists think the missing global heat might be hiding?
a. Deep in the oceans.
b. Behind the file cabinet.
c. Inside volcanoes.
d. Between tectonic plates.
e. In climate skeptics' craniums.

4. At the current pace of consumption when will humankind need a second planet earth to satisfy its appetites?
a. Huh? There's no second planet earth!
b. 2050
c. 2030
d. Tomorrow
e. Can we just eat the moon?

5. What did the EPA do regarding Shell Oil Co.?
a. Approved a permit for one of their drilling vessels.
b. Regulated their asses!
c. Prevented them from drilling in the Arctic Sea.
d. Approved their merger with Exxon.
e. Got into bed with their asses!

6. What did fellow Nobel Laureates Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama encourage Obama to do?
a. Stop smoking.
b. Save the whales.
c. Relinquish his Nobel Prize.
d. Let Hillary run.
e. Stop the Keystone XL pipeline.

7. Why are leading climatologists angry at the world's top cartographers?
a. Cartographers get better benefits, plus catered lunches.
b. A new map under-emphasizes ice melt in Greenland.
c. A new map misspells the word Greenland.
d. A new map exaggerates ice melt in Greenland.
e. Climatologists are angry by nature.

Answers:
___________________________________

1. What does a 20 year University of Florida study say Florida leads
the world in?
Correct Answer: (a): Invasive species
See "Invasive Amphibians, Reptiles in Florida Outnumber World, StudyFinds" (University of Florida via ScienceDaily)

2. What did a French study find happened to fish downstream from a
pharmaceutical plant?
Correct Answer: (e): They were intersex.
See "Gender-bent fish found downstream of pharmaceutical plants."
(Environmental Health News)

3. Where do climate scientists think the missing global heat might be
hiding?
Correct Answer: (a): Deep in the oceans.
See "Missing" global heat may hide in deep oceans" (Reuters)

4. At the current pace of consumption when will humankind need a
second planet earth to satisfy its appetites?
Correct Answer: (c): 2030
See "Humanity falls deeper into ecological debt: study" (PhysOrg)

5. What did the EPA do regarding Shell Oil Co.?
Correct Answer: (a): Approved a permit for one of their drilling
vessels.
See "EPA grants air permit to Shell for Arctic drilling" (CBS News)

6. What did fellow Nobel Laureates Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama encourage Obama to do?
Correct Answer: (e): Stop the Keystone XL pipeline.
See "For Obama, Peer Pressure from Nobel Laureates" (New York Times)

7. Why are leading climatologists angry at the world's top cartographers?
Correct Answer: (d): A new map exaggerates ice melt in Greenland.
See "Times Atlas is 'wrong on Greenland climate change'" (London Guardian)

___________________________________

For this week's news on Climate Chaos, Resource Depletion, Infectious Disease, Species Collapse, Biology Breach, and Recovery (with punchlines and mal mots), visit apocadocs.com.

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Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Tue, Sep 20, 2011 at 2:44 PM

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The ApocaDocs, Jim and Michael, present this week's Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) to test your knowledge of current environmental news.

New Free Book, "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies" This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What did researchers at the University of Bremen recently report regarding Arctic sea ice cover?

a. It's the lowest level on record.

b. Arctic sea ice reports are a cash cow for researchers.

c. Everyone has stopped paying attention.

d. It's the highest level on record.

e. It's replete with flame retardants.


2. What is causing the mass starvation of turtles and dugongs on the Great Barrier Reef?

a. They have resolved to stop eating each other.

b. Oil and petroleum spills.

c. The loss of pteropods to feast upon.

d. The loss of sea grass to feast upon.

e. It's an act of civil disobedience.


3. What are the "clean jeans" on display in Sheffield purported to do, via nanotechnology?

a. Make your butt look perfectly proportioned.

b. Hide your woodies.

c. Provide clean oxygen.

d. Break down pollutants.

e. Protect your wallet.


4. What is the White House under pressure to release from the EPA?

a. The "phthalates of phtha" list.

b. The "crap of concern" list.

c. The "toxins of terror" list.

d. The "chemicals of concern" list.

e. The "pollutants of panic" list.


5. What did state regulators do to four gas and drilling companies responsible for over 350 spills since January 2010?

a. Gave them "Outstanding Operators" awards.

b. Gave them "Offending Operators" awards.

c. Fined them.

d. Revoked their licenses.

e. Gave them "Inept Operators" awards.


6. What have coal companies done for John Boehner this year?

a. Sucked his Boehner.

b. Nothing -- and he's mad about it!

c. Contributed $1.5 million.

d. Gotten him lots of prostitutes.

e. Made his life miserable.


7. Why did Norwegian physicist and Nobel laureate Ivar Giaever quit a US physics society?

a. No one could pronounce his name.

b. The lack of dancing girls.

c. He doesn't believe in global warming.

d. He doesn't believe in physics.

e. They wouldn't park his car for him.

Continue reading »

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Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 7:30 AM

barretr_Earth-1.png

The ApocaDocs, Jim and Michael, present this week's Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) to test your knowledge of current environmental news.

New Free Book, "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies"

This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What is taking over the drinking wells of South Florida's coast?

a. Snails

b. Pesticide runoff

c. Leeches

d. Salt water

e. Alligators


2. What does a recent report say about climate change and insurance agencies?

a. Climate change will ruin insurance companies.

b. Climate change doesn't believe in insurance companies.

c. Insurance companies don't believe in climate change.

d. Insurance companies are going to make a lot of money.

e. Insurance companies are unprepared.


3. What is the UN warning, regarding the famine in Somalia?

a. 750,000 could die.

b. It's caused by the worst drought in 60 years.

c. Malnutrition among children is 58 percent.

d. Some 12 million people need food aid.

e. All of these answers are horrifyingly true.


4. What has a team of marine scientists recommended about commercial fishing?

a. Stop fishing in the deep sea.

b. Stop fishing near the coasts.

c. Stop making reality TV shows about it.

d. Stop fishing.

e. Commercials should be made about it.


5. What are scientists disturbed to have found on the edge of Antarctica?

a. Beached whales

b. Teetering ice shelves

c. A McDonald's

d. King crabs

e. Giant jellyfish


6. What does a study say about the environmental impact of switching from coal to natural gas?

a. It would make it worse!

b. It would do little good.

c. We're fracked.

d. Stop asking me these questions!

e. It would do a LOT of good!


7. What did the UN's Ban Ki-moon say in a speech at University of Sydney?

a. "Hot times shows it time to get hot on climate change."

b. "High temps are the devil's playthings."

c. "High tide shows it's high time to act."

d. "Good luck graduating and getting a job."

e. "High tide shows it's time to get high."

Continue reading »

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Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Wed, Sep 7, 2011 at 7:30 AM

barretr_Earth-1.png

The ApocaDocs, Jim and Michael, present this week's Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz
(PANIQuiz) to test your
knowledge of current environmental news.

Brought to you by Michael and Jim, the ApocaDocs.


New Free Book, "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies"

This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What did California state officials do with their own scientists'
information about pesticides?
a. Paid for it through the nose.
b. Ignored the information.
c. Created stricter regulations.
d. Fed it to their dogs, who ate it.
e. Doodled on it.

2. What does a new study say about animal extinction risks linked to
climate change?
a. Animals are pretty much screwed.
b. No one read the study.
c. They are half past estimates.
d. Mass extinction is certain by mid-century.
e. They are double past estimates.

3. When Republicans return from summer recess what do they plan to do
regarding the EPA?
a. Defund it.
b. Empower it.
c. Denude it.
d. Imprison it.
e. Scale back its regulations.

4. What is a USC study linking to prostrate cancer?
a. Too much sex
b. Pesticides
c. Flame retardants
d. Too little sex
e. Retard flamants

5. What are researchers in Switzerland using to try and create rain?
a. Laser beams
b. Cloud dusters
c. Runes
d. Prayer
e. Particle infractors

6. A new bird species was recently discovered. What was discovered at the
same time?
a. Its beak grows before your very eyes!
b. There's only one bird left... and his name is Adam.
c. It is extinct.
d. A new worm species.
e. It's actually a mammalian bird.

7. What did Obama do about the EPA's proposed rules on ozone?
a. Pretty much all of these are sadly true.
b. Valued economy over people.
c. Squashed 'em.
d. Kowtowed to Big Business.
e. Capitulated to Republicans.

Continue reading »

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Monday, August 29, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Mon, Aug 29, 2011 at 2:26 PM

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This week’s Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) brought to you by Michael and Jim, the ApocaDocs.


Get the New Free Book, "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies"


This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What will be lost if Canada doubles its current tar sands production?
a. 740,000 acres of boreal forest
b. Double digit unemployment
c. Inuit dignity
d. Hundreds of polar bears
e. Bill McKibben's faith

2. What is presidential candidate Jon Huntsman criticizing his fellow
Republicans about?
a. Being stubborn.
b. Being Republicans.
c. Being anti-science.
d. Being anti-liberal.
e. Being numbskulls.

3. What harm may nickel nanoparticles cause?
a. Depression
b. Kidney failure
c. Lung cancer
d. Early senility
e. Leukemia

4. What do scientists fear Roundup is damaging?
a. Farmers
b. Cowboy iconography
c. Their reputations
d. The soil itself
e. Crops

5. What was fortunately intercepted at a US airport?
a. An Emerald Ash Borer
b. A terrorist
c. Ebola
d. The Khapra beetle
e. An Asian carp

6. As president, what would Mitt Romney do about carbon emissions?
a. He would not place restrictions on them.
b. He would require they be sequestered.
c. He would outlaw them.
d. He doesn't believe in them.
e. He would place restrictions on them.

7. What is a BP security guard under investigation for?
a. Causing a pipe leak.
b. Talking to reporters.
c. Publicly yearning for The Rapture.
d. Blowing the whistle on BP.
e. Killing a polar bear.

Continue reading »

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Friday, August 19, 2011

Butler University to offer car sharing program

Posted By on Fri, Aug 19, 2011 at 3:11 PM

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Butler University has begun a partnership with Zipcar, Inc. to offer a Zipcar car sharing program on campus.

According to a press release from Butler University, two Zipcars are available for student, faculty and staff use 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Zipcars will be located in the Atherton Student Union lot.

A Toyota Prius and a Mazda3 are the two Zipcars offered. Participants will pay as low as $8 per hour and $66 a day in addition to $35 annually to use the vehicles, which can be reserved for hours or multiple days at a time.

The Zipcars can be accessed at any time of the day and can be reserved by smartphone or online at the Zipcar website.

Butler University representatives hope the program will show students that there is less of a need to bring their cars to campus and that use of the Zipcars will reduce traffic congestion and the university's carbon footprint.

Learn more at www.zipcar.com/butler.

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Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Manic Panic: Your enviro-PANIQuiz for the week

Posted By on Tue, Aug 16, 2011 at 9:00 AM

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The ApocaDocs, Jim and Michael, present the Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) for the week beginning Monday, August 8, 2011, to test your knowledge of current environmental news.

Free Book, "Humoring the Horror of the Converging Emergencies"
http://apocadocs.com/book/

This Week's PANIQuestions (Answers below):

1. What happened after the governors of Texas and Oklahoma asked citizens to pray about the drought?

a. The drought worsened
b. It rained
c. Jesus returned... what, you didn't know?
d. The governors got high approval ratings
e. It rained frogs

2. What does a new book say is needed to save the planet?

a. An anti-christ
b. Prayer
c. A massive pandemic
d. A militant movement
e. Godzilla

3. What deadline are Obama officials missing for the fourth time?

a. Issuing fuel economy standards.
b. Restricting snow mobiles from the federal park system.
c. Restricting pollutants from coal-fired plants.
d. Issuing rules on low-level ozone.
e. Saving the world.

4. According to NOAA what could soon cause global disruptions in power grids?

a. Too many cell phones
b. Squirrels
c. Too much air conditioning
d. Terrorists
e. Solar storms

5. Who might be the natural gas industry's biggest enemy right now?

a. The coal industry
b. Environmentalists
c. The oil industry
d. The nuclear industry
e. The New York Times

6. As the Texas drought worsens, what will Texans be drinking?

a. Their sweat
b. The blood of sheep
c. Lots and lots of beer
d. The blood of Christ
e. Recycled urine

7. What's the newest item found to contain bisphenol A?

a. Monkey shines
b. Paper money
c. Toilet seats
d. Pet fur
e. Organic food

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    It's just pointing out how out-of-touch the current administration is. And how hard it is…
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