Thursday, March 29, 2012

IRT announces 2012-13 season

Posted By on Thu, Mar 29, 2012 at 1:19 PM

Sylvia McNair, starring in IRTs 2013 production of A Little Night Music.
  • Sylvia McNair, starring in IRT's 2013 production of 'A Little Night Music.'

Sondheim's A Little Night Music is the most ambitious production on an 2012-13 Indiana Repertory Theatre schedule that largely resembles the previous season's with its mix of monologues (the three-play Going Solo festival, with IRT playwright-in-residence James Still once again contributing a new play) and familiar classics (A Christmas Carol, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde). The season's Black History Month-related production is Jackie and Me, about a boy's time-travel-enabled meeting with baseball color-line breaker Jackie Robinson; the Shakespeare is A Midsummer Night's Dream.

Two-time Grammy winner and IU instructor Sylvia McNair - who has proven, over a long career, adept across opera, cabaret and musical theatre settings - stars as Desiree in A Little Night Music, which is already in pre-production, with late summer casting calls on the way in Indy, Chicago and New York City.

Two plays in the Going Solo festival have been announced, with one yet to be revealed: The Night Watcher by Charlayne Woodard, once again starring Millicent Wright, who has played Woodard in prior IRT productions of her work; and Still's The House That Jack Built, about old friends spending a Thanksgiving together in Vermont.

Also on the lineup is Matthew Lopez's 2006 The Whipping Man, about a Passover Seder in a decrepit antebellum mansion shortly after the Civil War; The New York Times has described it as "surely having few equals in its arresting strangeness."

Here's the complete lineup:

Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher
September 5-30

The Night Watcher, by Charlayne Woodard (part of the Going Solo festival)
September 20-October 15

The House That Jack Built, by James Still (part of the Going Solo festival)
October 30-November 25

A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens, presented by St.Vincent Health
November 25- December 24

Jackie and Me, by Steven Dietz, adapted from the book by Dan Gutman
January 11-February 16

A Little Night Music, by Steven Sondheim
January 23-February 17

The Whipping Man, by Matthew Lopez
March 5-24

A Midsummer Night's Dream, by William Shakespeare
April 10-May 12

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Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Inside Thebes: Oedipus at Colonus

Posted By on Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 3:19 PM

Michael Bachman suggests trying it the other way.
  • Scot McKim
  • Michael Bachman suggests trying it the other way.

This spring, NoExit Performance Company will mount the entire Oedipal play cycle (Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone) on the grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, with a single cast presenting all three plays. Have the members of this relatively young theater company bitten off more than they can chew? Katelyn Coyne, NUVO theater writer by day and a member of the chorus for all three plays by night, is effectively answering that question by blogging every other week about the rehearsal process. This is the third installment.

Most are familiar with the stories of Oedipus Rex and his tragic daughter Antigone; less well known is Oedipus at Colonus, which falls second in the timeline of the plays, but was the last to be written by Sophocles, shortly before his death. In it, the blinded Oedipus flees Thebes with his daughter, Antigone.

Director Michael Bachman has fearlessly led our crew over the past three weeks. With the play fully-blocked and last-minute actor substitutions in place, this rehearsal process has been extremely truncated. Yet, his razor-sharp focus keeps him productive in the face of these challenges. Here is what he has to say about the process thus far:

Coyne: How do you view Colonus in terms of the whole trilogy?

Bachman: It's really to connect the dots, and you can tell that by all the prophecies that are in it. I mean it's obvious that the trilogy had ended, the story had ended, and this really was after-the-fact. [Sophocles' original] audience must have wanted to know what happened. Otherwise, why would Sophocles sit down and pen it? With that, we can find great purposes in the piece. If NoExit had decided to just produce the two, I think people would've ended up with the same questions. Our focus is to help the audience make those connections.

Coyne: What was your entry point for this script?

Bachman: Knowing that it was written after the other two just to kind of fill in the gaps left me, at first, very stagnant. The biggest battle for me to fight was how am I going to make it so it's not stagnant ? For the most part, explanation is not interesting. But I really liked the fact that Oedipus was a rock. He doesn't move a lot; the action just comes in around him. It's going to be very different from the other two pieces that travel so much. And it being the midpoint, the audience comes to a place of rest, for a little bit, in the same way that Oedipus does.

Coyne: I've read that Sophocles wrote this during the last years of his life. Do you think perhaps he was trying to understand his own impending death by writing about Oedipus?

Bachman: There's a lot to that. Something that we're finding in the rehearsal process is that, even more so then in Antigone or Oedipus Rex, these characters are very human. That's not something we always see from Sophocles. We usually saw inflated caricatures of possible historical figures or tragic figures... that kind of idea. [In Colonus] everyone is very human. There are not a lot of big fights; there is not a lot of offstage action. Though I haven't read that, it makes a lot of sense. For him and the people around him to understand his own death. And possibly to go out in the same quiet way that Oedipus does.

The NoExit crew at work on Oedipus at Colonus.
  • Scot McKim
  • The NoExit crew at work on 'Oedipus at Colonus.'

Coyne: With so many obstacles, rehearsing with a partial cast, you've been able to stay so focused and actually get work done. How do you do that?

Bachman: My professional life has built me to do that, just remaining flexible, going with the flow. I also came in with a plan of how to do it. I had in my head a very clear vision of how it was going to go. So I can very easily scratch something, because of scheduling conflicts in rehearsal, and go on to something else. That's what made it so easy and fluid for me.

Coyne: What has been your personal biggest challenge so far?

Bachman: As I director, I think about my performers a lot. Their biggest challenge is not always having their co-actor on-stage. It's difficult to try to pull things out of them, even though there is no one acting with them. Also when I step into a role for them, I can't see everything that's going on, but I'm still trying to give everything that I can, so atleast the other actors have something to pull from and use.

Coyne: How do you bring your foundation as a director of abstract, visually striking pieces (Sarah Kane's 4:48 Psychosis) to this more traditional Greek tragedy?

Bachman: I'm hoping to find those images for this piece, but I think those images are more in the words. In 4:48, the images are what lasts. But in this, its going to be the words of Oedipus and the other characters that last.

Coyne: The most striking image so far is the presence of all the characters who die throughout the trilogy around our fountain. Where did that come from?

Bachman: Oedipus was part of so many people's lives. I wanted to find a way to bring all that in. A large portion of a my master program was in a Greek tragedy class. My professor was very interested in was the decaying body on stage. What would it be like in all theses Greek tragedies if, when someone died, the body just stayed there, and we as an audience watch the way that body changes our perception of the people left alive onstage? If we get to look at Jocasta's body instead of just talk about it? I thought that might be a great tool for this, so we could see everyone Oedipus touches and also see that humanity of him caring for them.

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Slideshow: Roller Girls conquer Dutchland

Posted By on Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

Another uneven match-up doesn't mean there wasn't plenty of action as the Dutchland Rollers visited the Naptown Roller Girls at Pepsi Coliseum.

Slideshow
Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow)
Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow) Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow)

Naptown Roller Girls vs. Dutchland Rollers (Slideshow)

By Stacy Kagiwada

Click to View 18 slides

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Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Bringing in Spring, with kites and puppets

Posted By on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 at 4:15 PM

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Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow)
Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow) Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow)

Spring Equinox at IMA (Slideshow)

By Paul F. P. Pogue

Click to View 13 slides

Heather Henson, daughter of master puppeteer Jim Henson, says her best memories of growing up Henson involved quiet times outside in a nearby wildlife refuge. So perhaps it's appropriate that her shows this weekend in Indianapolis took place at the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s 100 Acres Art & Nature Park, as part of “Spring Equinox: Celebration of Flight.”

“He’d be working so hard, and one of the first things he’d do when he got home was take me for a walk in the woods,” Henson said, in response to questions submitted by children prior to the show. “My dad was born in Mississippi, and he loved that style of music and the countryside.”

Among other things, the “Celebration of Flight” event was evidence of the top-class entertainment you can sometimes find in this city. It’s not often you’ll see a performance from the first family of puppetry, up close and free of charge, no less, as Henson showed her interpretation of a crane’s life cycle, from a single-handed puppet of a hatchling to a forty-foot-wide adult that required three people to operate.

Henson’s puppetry marked only one element of the performance; the master kitemakers from Guildworks provided a remarkable display of aerial artistry, guiding and steeting low-flying kites with such precision that it was hard to believe they were using string and not rigid poles to keep things under control. It's a lot harder to guide a kite ten feet off the ground than a hundred, and there's nothing quite like a couple of hundred feet of windswept cloth whizzing only a few feet above your head.

The whole thing brought together an effective combination of dance, puppetry and kites, with performers in dazzling white and green sprinting across the fields, closing out with Henson leading a small army of children flying their own handmade kites across the site. The kids certainly seemed to be enjoying themselves. So did she.

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Monday, March 19, 2012

Interview: Tiny-house guru Jay Shafer

Posted By on Mon, Mar 19, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Jay Shafer lived in Iowa City and decided to simplify his life. How? By building and living in a teeny-tiny house. After quickly learning to love his life's newfound simplicity, Shafer started the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company. He brings his experience — as well as a tiny house — to Butler University tomorrow at 5:30 p.m. in the Johnson Room at Robertson Hall.

I spoke with Shafer Friday in advance of his visit, asking him about tiny houses, of course, but particularly about how tiny houses relate to cats, tornadoes, downsizing and the long arm of the law. Check out the full interview at Indiana Living Green.

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Friday, March 16, 2012

Slideshows: St. Patrick's Day Parade

Posted By on Fri, Mar 16, 2012 at 5:30 PM

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Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1)
Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1)

Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 1)

Indianapolis celebrated St. Patties day in style, with a Green canal, Green Beer and a Parade.

By Brandon Knapp

Click to View 31 slides

The day-before-St.-Patrick's-Day festivities kicked off at 6 a.m. this morning, when Mayor Ballard presided over the annual greening of the canal. The parade began mid-morning, with revelers were treated to some great sights, including old cars, fire trucks, marching bands, Civil and Revolutionary War reenactors, dancers and bagpipers.

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Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2)
Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2) Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2)

Slideshow: St. Patties Day Parade (pt. 2)

By Brandon Knapp

Click to View 21 slides

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Midwest Fashion Week's The Art of Fashion

Posted By on Fri, Mar 16, 2012 at 4:28 PM

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Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow]
Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow] Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow]

Midwest Fashion Week at iMOCA [Slideshow]

Art and fashion collided Thursday night as the Midwest Fashion Week brought its traveling citywide fashion show to the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art.

By Paul F. P. Pogue

Click to View 14 slides

The week-long traveling couture roadshow that is Midwest Fashion Week ran headlong into two-dimensional art Thursday night at the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art for “The Art of Fashion.”

“We wanted to improve fashion in Indiana by combining art with fashion,” said MFW guru Berny Martin at the event’s opening. “Now, fashion is already art, but this was bringing together two specific fields. Art influenced by art.”

Designs from Larry Fuhs, Rebecca Isaacs of 86 couture and the International Interior Design Association had a wildly theatrical sense of flair. Fuhs did most of his work with upholstery; Isaacs used plastics, metal and, in one case, stretched-out neon nylon to assemble the avante-garde designs.

“My theme is recycled materials; it’s a fun outlet,” Isaacs says. “Anything from plastics to metals to overalls. I really liked the concept of combining it with an art display. It’s an amazing backdrop and it makes the clothing itself even more exciting.”

Exciting is the right word. The event carried an air of fun about it; even the models who adopted pouty demeanors had a sense of genuinely enjoying themselves. DJ Stephan kept a steady and peppy beat throughout the night, and you haven’t seen fashion until a model does the robot in front of modern art. The crowd members themselves were so fashionable that you couldn’t really tell who the models were until you watched for a few moments to figure out who was milling around and who was staying in one place. Fashion piled upon fashion, art influencing art.

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Midwest Fashion Week's student night

Posted By on Fri, Mar 16, 2012 at 4:00 PM

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Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week
Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week

Student Fashion Show at Midwest Fashion Week

Larrea Young took home top honors at Midwest Fashion Week's Student Fashion Show, held March 13 at the Madame Walker Theatre Center.

By Mark A. Lee

Click to View 21 slides

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Sunday, March 11, 2012

ISO announces 2012-2013 season

Posted By on Sun, Mar 11, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Urbanski and the ISO.
  • Courtesy of the ISO
  • Urbanski and the ISO.
Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra music director Krzysztof Urbanski will return next fall to conduct ten of the orchestra's 20 classical programs, increasing his local presence from the six he will have conducted by this season's end. The embedded Symphonic Hits Series will disappear as a separate moniker, to be absorbed as six specials within the 20, with the same pre and post-concert events as the "Hits" featured. A welcome change is that all the "Hits" events will move half an hour later to gel with the remaining 14 classical programs; all evening concerts will then start at 8 p.m.

Another reason for dropping that title is that most all of next season's programming will include a plethora of hits — more than in past seasons. This is undoubtedly reflective, at least in part, of the poor turnout seen in a number of concerts this season—and also possibly a reaction to the continuing sluggish economy. On the other hand, these choices include many works not recently performed, indicating that the upcoming roster of offerings suggests careful consideration by the programmers. For example, when was the last time time Tchaikovsky's Francesca da Rimini was programmed? As it turns out, not for a decade. Look for it to conclude the Feb. 1-2 program.

Urbanski, as a native of Poland, will also include a number of Polish works. "There are significant milestones for Polish composers this year and next year," he said. "Wojciech Kilar celebrates this 80th birthday in 2012, Krzysztof Penderecki turns 80 next year, and 2013 marks the 100th anniversary of Witold Lutoslawski's birth. I'm honoring their achievements by bringing more remarkable works from Poland's great composers - Kilar, Lutoslawski, Chopin and Mieczyslaw Karlowicz - to Indianapolis."

Guest conductors and soloists, both new and returning, are too numerous to highlight. One notable conductor returning after many years is former ISO music director (1976-1987) John Nelson, featuring a vocal/choral program. See the entire program schedule below for details.

Poor turnout has not been a problem this season for the ISO's Pops Series, with a greater expenditure resulting in more grandiose stage presentations — and receiving much patron praise — put together by principal pops conductor Jack Everly. "After the phenomenal success of our 2011-2012 season we have created an equally exciting series for you next year," Everly said.

The upcoming season features a concert stage production of the hit Broadway musical Hairspray, in a performance debut. Singer Jane Monheit and violinist and mandolin player Aaron Weinstein will bring a weekend of jazz; the classic film West Side Story will come to life with the orchestra performing the legendary LeonardBernstein score to accompany the film; ISO ensemble-in-residence Time for Three will bring a new eclectic pops program to the Pops Series. These are just four of the eight pops concerts. See them all below.

On November 20, the ISO's will highlight jazz saxophonist and pop music icon Kenny G in a holiday special event with Everly and the orchestra. Other special events will be announced for the 2012-2013 season in the coming months.

As usual, Everly will lead this season's 27th annual Yuletide Celebration from November 30 through December 23. And once again, the orchestra will collaborate with the Indianapolis Symphonic Choir and artistic director Eric Stark, who will conduct Handel's Messiah on December 15at Clowes Hall. ISO conductor laureate Raymond Leppard and the ISO will present the 15th annual Classical Christmas concert December 8 at the Scottish Rite Cathedral Ballroom. The orchestra will ring in the new year with its annual New Year's Eve Celebration December 31 at the Hilbert Circle Theatre.

The four Sunday matinee Family Concerts will be titled SymFUNy Sundays, with programs approximately one hour in length and no intermission. They are designed especially with the young listener in mind. See them all below.


2012-2013 SEASON
CALENDAR - LISTED BY SERIES


CLASSICAL SERIES


(1) Beethoven &
Dvorak


Friday, September 14, 8 p.m.

Saturday, September 15, 5:30
p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Alina Pogostkina, Violin


BEETHOVEN Coriolan Overture, Op. 62

BEETHOVEN Violin
Concerto in D Major, Op. 61

DVORAK Symphony No. 7 in D Minor, Op. 70


(2) Mozart's "Jupiter"
Symphony


Thursday, September 27, 11 a.m.

Friday, September 28, 8 p.m.

Saturday, September 29, 8
p.m.


Leo Hussain, Conductor

Zach De Pue, Violin


NIELSEN Helios Overture, Op. 17

PROKOFIEV Violin
Concerto No. 1 in D
Major, Op. 19

BRITTEN "FourSea Interludes" from Peter Grimes, Op. 33a

MOZART Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551 ("Jupiter")


(3) The Genius of Mozart


Friday, October 5, 8 p.m.

Saturday, October 6, 8 p.m.


Paul Watkins, Conductor

Shai Wosner, Piano


MOZART Symphony No. 26 in E-flat Major, K. 184

MOZART Piano Concerto No. 22 in E-flat Major, K. 482

MOZART Adagio and Fugue in C Minor,
Op. 546

MOZART Symphony No. 36 in C Major, K. 425 ("Linz")

(4) Dance of Death


Friday, October 12, 8 p.m.

Saturday, October 13, 8 p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Anna Vinnitskaya, Piano


MUSSORGSKY Night
on Bare Mountain

RACHMANINOFF Rhapsody
on a Theme of Paganini
, Op. 43

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 12 in D Minor, Op. 112 ("The Year 1917")


(5) Debussy's La Mer &
Ravel's Boléro


Friday, October 19, 8 p.m.

Saturday, October 20, 5:30
p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Twyla Robinson, Soprano


MESSIAEN Pomes
pour Mi

DEBUSSY La Mer

RAVEL Boléro


(6) Brahms' A German Requiem


Friday, November 2, 8 p.m.

Saturday, November 3, 8 p.m.


John Nelson, ConductorAga Mikolaj, Soprano

Nathan Berg, Baritone

Indianapolis
Symphonic Choir


MOZART Exsultate jubilate, K. 165

BRAHMS A German Requiem, Op. 43


(7) Spanish Seductions


Thursday, November 8, 11 a.m.

Friday, November 9, 8 p.m.


Saturday, November 10, 5:30
p.m.


Eugene Tzigane, Conductor

Milos KaradagliÄ , Guitar


RAVEL Alborado del grazioso

RODRIGO Concierto de Aranjuez for Guitar &
Orchestra

TURINA Sinfonia sevillana, Op. 23

RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Capriccio
espagnol,
Op. 34


(8) Bruckner's Symphony
No. 4


Friday, January 18, 8 p.m.

Saturday, January 19, 8 p.m.


Antoni Wit, Conductor


HAYDN Symphony No. 88 in G Major

BRUCKNER Symphony
No. 4 E-flat Major ("Romantic")


(9) The "Organ" Symphony


Thursday, January 24, 11 a.m.

Friday, January 25, 8 p.m.

Saturday, January 26, 8 p.m.


Jun Markl, Conductor

Zuill Bailey, Cello


BLOCH Schelomo: Hebraic Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra

NICO MUHLY Cello Concerto (American Premiere)

SAINT-SAENS Symphony No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 78 ("Organ")


(10) Emanuel Ax Returns!


Friday, February 1, 8 p.m.

Saturday, February 2, 5:30 p.m.


Giancarlo Guerrero, Conductor

Emanuel Ax, Piano


BEETHOVEN Piano
Concerto No. 4 in G
Major, Op. 58

R. STRAUSS Death and Transfiguration, Op. 24

TCHAIKOVSKY Francesca
da Rimini,
Op. 32


(11) The Romantic
Violinist: Daniel Hope


Thursday, February 14, 11 a.m.

Friday, February 15, 8 p.m.

Saturday, February 16, 8 p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Daniel Hope, Violin


BEETHOVEN Leonore Overture No. 3 in C Major, Op. 72a

BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 26

BRAHMS Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68


(12) Mahler & Schumann
with Thomas Hampson


Friday, February 22, 8 p.m.


Joana Carneiro, Conductor

Thomas Hampson, Baritone


MAHLER Songs from Des Knaben Wunderhorn

R. SCHUMANN Symphony No. 2 in C Major, Op. 61


(13) Tchaikovsky's Symphony
No. 6


Friday, March 1, 8 p.m.

Saturday, March 2, 5:30 p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Bezhod Abduraimov, Piano


KAR�OWICZ Stanislaw and Anna Oswiecimowie, Op.
12

CHOPIN Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, Op. 21

TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in B Minor, Op. 74 ("Pathétique")


(14) Pictures at an
Exhibition


Friday, March 22, 8 p.m.

Saturday, March 23, 8 p.m.
p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Sol Gabetta, Cello


BRAHMS Tragic Overture
in D Minor, Op. 81

R. SCHUMANN Cello
Concerto No. 1 in A Minor, Op. 129

MUSSORGSKY/Ravel Pictures
at an Exhibition


(15) Beethoven's Fifth


Thursday, April 4, 11 a.m.

Friday, April 5, 8 p.m.

Saturday, April 6, 8 p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Nicola Benedetti, Violin


TBA Martha
and Eugene Glick Competition Winner (TBA)

TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35

BEETHOVEN Symphony
No. 5 in C Minor,
Op. 67


(16) Rite of Spring


Friday, April 12, 8 p.m.

Saturday, April 13, 5:30
p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Dejan Lazic, Piano


BRAHMS/
Lazic "Piano Concerto No. 3" in D Major (Transcription from Violin
Concerto)

STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring


(17) Sibelius' Symphony No.
5


Thursday, May 9, 11 a.m.

Saturday, May 11, 8 p.m.


John Storgards, Conductor

Kirill Gerstein, Piano


SIBELIUS The Bard, Op. 64

PROKOFIEV Piano
Concerto No. 1 in
D-flat Major, Op. 10

R. STRAUSS Burleske in D Minor for Piano and
Orchestra

SIBELIUS Symphony No. 5 in E-flat Major, Op. 82


(18) String Evolution


Thursday, May 17, 11 a.m.

Friday, May 18, 8 p.m.


Zach De Pue, Leader

ISO String Section


FROST "Reyja" from Solaris

SCHUBERT Mvt. I from Death and the Maiden

J.S. BACH Brandenburg
Concerto No. 3 in G
Major, BWV 1048

VITALI Chaconne for String Orchestra

COLINA Nesting Dolls

KILAR Orawa

SCHUBERT Mvt.
II from Death and the Maiden

TCHAIKOVSKY Finale from Souvenir de Florence


(19) An American
Rhapsody: UrbaÅ"ski
Conducts Gershwin


Thursday, May 30, 11 a.m.

Friday, May 31,,8 p.m.

Saturday, June 1, 8 p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Awadagin Pratt, Piano

Time for Three, String Trio


BERNSTEIN Overture
to Candide

WILLIAM
BOLCOM Games and Challenges: Something Wonderful
Right Away
(Concerto for Time for Three)

(Performance debut)

GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue

GERSHWIN An American in Paris


(20) Urbanski &
Thibaudet


Friday, June 7, 8 p.m.

Saturday, June 8, 5:30 p.m.


Krzysztof Urbanski, Conductor

Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Piano


MOZART Overture to The Abduction from the Seraglio, K. 384

MacMILLAN Piano
Concerto No. 3 ("The Mysteries of Light")

LUTOSL�AWSKI Concerto for Orchestra


POPS SERIES


(1) Time for Three


Friday, September 21, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, September 22, 8
p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, September 23, 7:30
p.m. - The Palladium


Jack Everly, Conductor

Time for Three, String Trio

Zach De
Pue, Violin

Nick
Kendall, Violin

Ranaan
Meyer, Bass


(2) Jazz with Jane Monheit
& Aaron Weinstein


Friday, October 26, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, October 27, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, October 28, 7:30
p.m. - The Palladium


Jack Everly, Conductor

Jane Monheit, Vocalist

Aaron Weinstein, Violin & Mandolin


(3) West Side Story Live with the ISO


Friday, November 16, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, November 17, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, November 18, 7:30
p.m. - The Palladium


David Newman, Conductor


(4) Performance debut - The Musical Hairspray in Concert


Friday, January 11, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, January 12, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, January 13, 7:30
p.m. - The Palladium


Jack Everly, Conductor

John Waters, Narrator


Cast, TBA


(5) Sinatra: The Best Is Yet To Come


Friday, February 8, 11 a.m. & 8 p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, February 9, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, February 10, 7:30
p.m. - The Palladium


Steven Reineke, Conductor

Ryan Silverman, Vocalist

Betsy Wolfe, Vocalist


(6) The Music of ABBA
Starring Rajaton


Friday, March 15, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, March 16, 9, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, March 17, 7:30 p.m.
- The Palladium


Jack Everly, Conductor

Rajaton, A Cappella Sextet


(7) Broadway Star Lea
Salonga in Concert


Friday, April 26, 11 a.m.* & 8 p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, April 27, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, April 28, 7:30 p.m.
- The Palladium


Jack Everly, Conductor

Lea Salonga, Vocalist


(8) Gotta Dance!


Friday, June 14, 11 a.m.* & 8 p.m. - Hilbert Circle Theatre

Saturday, June 15, 8 p.m.
- Hilbert Circle Theatre

Sunday, June 16, 7:30 p.m.
- The Palladium


Jack Everly, Conductor

Artists TBA


SymFUNy Sundays


(1) Around the World with
the ISO


Sunday, November 4, 3 p.m.


David Glover, Conductor


The ISO will take young listeners on a musical journey
around the world, from the passionate rhythms of Spanish dances to the American
frontier with music by Bizet, Gershwin, and
Mussorgsky, among others.


(2) Yuletide Celebration


Sunday, December 2, 2 p.m.


Jack Everly, Conductor

TBA, Host


Jack Everly conducts the 27th annual rendition of
the ISO's popular holiday production.


(3) Dance to the Music!


Sunday, March 11, 3 p.m.


David Glover, Conductor


The ISO will explore the magic and the music from all genres
of dance for audiences of all ages.


(4) Happily Ever
After:
Mother Goose Suite


Sunday, May 5, 3 p.m.


David Glover, Conductor

Enchantment Theatre Company


From Sleeping Beauty to Prince Charming's heroic rescue of
his Princess, favorite fairytales musically portrayed in Ravel's Mother Goose Suite are brought to life
by the actors and dancers of Enchantment Theatre Company.



SPECIAL EVENTS


Kenny G with the ISO

Tuesday, November 20, 7:30
p.m.

Jack Everly, Conductor

Kenny G, Saxophone

One of the top-selling pop recording artists of all time,
jazz saxophonist Kenny G will join Jack Everly and the ISO to perform
many of his hits from a solo career that spans three decades.



Celebration of Black
History Concert

Tuesday, February 5, 7:30
p.m.

Conductor TBA

Free admission; general seating


HOLIDAY PROGRAMS


Duke Energy Yuletide
Celebration

Friday, November 30 - Friday, December 23

Jack Everly, Conductor

TBA, Host

Jack Everly conducts the 27th annual rendition of
the ISO's popular holiday production.


Classical Christmas

Saturday, December 8, 5:30
p.m.

Raymond Leppard, Conductor

Scottish Rite Cathedral Ballroom


Handel's Messiah

Saturday, December 15, 8 p.m.

Eric Stark, Conductor

Indianapolis
Symphonic Choir

Vocalists TBA


New Year's Eve
Celebration

Monday, December 31, 9 p.m.

Conductor TBA

Clowes Memorial Hall

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Friday, March 9, 2012

Fun with found objects

Posted By on Fri, Mar 9, 2012 at 4:00 PM

Paul Reynolds, Julie Musial, Andrea Swartz, Michael Gastineau
  • Dan Grossman
  • Paul Reynolds, Julie Musial, Andrea Swartz, Michael Gastineau

“Chairs are not just chairs when they’re broken into components and reassembled,” Wes Janz tells me as we watch a group of students and faculty breaking down steel frame chairs to reassemble them into sculpture. Janz, a professor of architecture at Ball State University, is leading a found object workshop at the Herron School of Art & Design on this Friday morning. Later in the day, he'll opening the doors to Couched Constructions, a show he curated featuring artwork made of repurposed couches.

The name of the game this morning is to turn items purchased from Goodwill into structural objects. I sit down with a group of five working with a pile of furniture — steel frame office chairs, lawn chairs and wooden stools, not to mention a plentiful supply of twist ties.

This crew is largely from Ball State. There's Andrea Swartz, a professor of architecture; Michael Gastineau, a third-year student; Julie Musial, a career-change student in interior design, Paul Reynolds, in his sixth year. Sherry Gruber, a community artist, is the only one who didn't drive from Muncie.

With its stem made out of broken-down chair steel and aluminum frame components and a crown of lawn chairs, one structure takes on a flower-like structure. Alternate names for the structure are proposed: "Material Dialogue,” “Flower Dialogue,” and “Make it a Dialogue.” A Disney Princess chair is soon added to the mix, and “Princess Dialogue” becomes the working title.

Then the group starts in on the wood stools, assembling the leg structures into a sculpture that quickly comes to resemble half of an arched bridge. The steel-based and wood based sculptures are then brought into proximity with one another. The team puts an umbrella between the two, bridging the gap between the half-bridge and the "Princess Dialogue."

Presto — the two bridges are in dialogue, meta-dialogue, maybe. Not bad for the fruit of two and a half hours.

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Inside Thebes: A casting nightmare

Posted By on Fri, Mar 9, 2012 at 3:19 PM

Rex director Michael Burke gives notes in rehearsal. - SCOT MCKIM
  • Scot McKim
  • Rex director Michael Burke gives notes in rehearsal.

This spring, NoExit Performance Company will mount the entire Oedipal play cycle (Oedipus Rex, Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone) on the grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, with a single cast presenting all three plays. Have the members of this relatively young theater company bitten off more than they can chew? Katelyn Coyne, NUVO theater writer by day and a member of the chorus for all three plays by night, is effectively answering that question by blogging every other week about the rehearsal process. This is the second installment.

Week Three: A Casting Nightmare

When I sent off my last communique, I was a member of a four person chorus in NoExit's Oedipal play cycle. Two weeks later our numbers have dwindled to only two: myself and Zachariah Stonerock. More of the spotlight for us; Zachariah and I will now become the stars we were always meant to be. Or at least that's my running joke in rehearsal.

There's more: Shortly before the rehearsal process started, our Ismene announced that she was pregnant. After doing the math, the company realized that by opening night, the actress would be sporting a basketball-sized belly. The subtext of having a pregnant Ismene simply won't serve the directors' concepts.

Our Eurydice and Theseus have also dropped out, due to an injury and concert tour, respectively. The state of things in Thebes are looking a little bleak, which actually seems appropriate, given the trilogy's subject matter of a kingdom in shambles.

The news that our chorus would be halved came via text message. "Our [quartet] is down to two," said Rex director Michael Burke. "I am canceling rehearsal tonight. Our stumble thru would be more like a hobble thru. I need to regroup a little bit and discuss with George."

Georgeanna Smith (in red pants) leads dancers as Burke looks on. - SCOT MCKIM
  • Scot McKim
  • Georgeanna Smith (in red pants) leads dancers as Burke looks on.

George, short for Georgeanna Smith, is the artistic director of NoExit. Later that night, Zach and I received an email from her explaining the situation. The statement she made that most struck a chord with me was this: "I know it can be demoralizing to lose some of your team." I hadn't felt demoralized before I started reading, but my spirits were, well, a bit dimmed afterwards.

After completing casting more than six month ago, NoExit leadership is now in the position of scrambling at the last minute, knowing that every delay puts will put all three shows further behind schedule.

"It's kind of a double-edged sword in a way," Burke told me. "We are making every effort that we can to be as professional as possible. That does require us to put in a lot of work for very little in return. We all do it because we really believe in what we are doing and what the future holds for the company. [But actors] come in and, we don't expect them to commit every waking moment like we have, but at the same time they've made a commitment to the show and we planned accordingly. It's very disheartening when people decide we are not worth the commitment."

Smith remains optimistic, an essential quality for the director of an adolescent company. "It's been a great opportunity to explore the talent that Indianapolis holds," she said of her quest to recast. Smith chalks it up to growing pains: "I kind of expected this to happen. It was the first time we did general auditions months before a project. [But] I should mention that this whole thing was stressful. It has prohibited me from working solely as a director and a cast member."

NoExit is still in the process of recasting the needed character and chorus roles. Replacements for Ismene and Eurydice are already in place; actors are still being read for Theseus and the chorus.

Smith is confident that this whole project is "do-able." But is her confidence and leadership enough for this small, but growing company, to produce three plays in repertory? I'm not sure. What I am sure of is that no one else is giving up. Or at least, I hope.

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Thursday, March 8, 2012

A new home for marginalized fantasy art

Posted By on Thu, Mar 8, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Donato Giancola, Taming of Smeagol (detail)
  • Donato Giancola, "Taming of Smeagol" (detail)
The sign outside Atlas Fantasy Art House depicts the titular Earth-hoister — one of the primordial Titans of Greek mythology — looking buffer than the buffest Marvel Comics superhero. As it happens, the sign's illustrator, Boris Vallejo, known for his depictions of John Carter of Mars and Tarzan among others, is also among several artists whose fantasy art will soon be available in the gallery, opening this week in Carmel under the direction of a certain William H. Niemeyer III.

Just as a populist artist like Norman Rockwell didn't get his due from the critical establishment during his life, Niemeyer believes that science fiction and fantasy art get a bad rap from the intelligentsia. He's working to facilitate its reappraisal — both through his gallery and a forthcoming film, Fantasy Art: A Journey into Creation, currently in pre-production. The gallery, smack dab in middle of Carmel's Arts & Design District, will showcase the work of a dozen artists whom he represents, including Donato Giancola, the featured artists for Friday's grand opening ceremony.

The lines between fine art and fantasy art indeed blur at Niemeyer's gallery: While, for instance, Giancola’s painting “Taming of Smeagol” refers to a very specific scene in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, the beautiful woman in profile in his painting “Autumn” is the subject of no particular narrative. Both paintings come alive using classical techniques concerning proportion and portraiture. In Olivia DeBerardinis's “Sweet Nothings” — which appeared in a 2008 issue of Playboy — the same caliber of technical mastery is deployed to evoke a male see-through lingerie fantasy.

Originally from New Jersey, Niemeyer has served in the Air Force, worked as a weather forecaster and, most recently, as a physician’s assistant. But his real passion has always been science fiction/fantasy art. I spoke to him Thursday, as he prepared for the opening.

Boris Vallekjos sign for Atlas Fantasy Art House.
  • Boris Vallejo's sign for Atlas Fantasy Art House.
NUVO: How did you get interested in science fiction/fantasy art?

Niemeyer: I grew up reading literature. Camus and Dostoyevsky are some examples, but I also liked science fiction, and sometimes the cover would tell the story or draw you into the book. Michael Whelan had the gift for doing that, as well as Boris Vallejo, and I’ve bought so many books just based on the covers. So I’ve always loved the art itself. And it’s just a peculiar thing to be representing [Whelan and Vallejo] now.

NUVO: How did you get started in the business?

Niemeyer: Well, I started off with high-end comics. I used to see things like Spider Man #1, Fantastic Four #1, the high end stuff. And then I got a piece of original art and I never went back because the books can come and go. You’ve probably heard of Action Comics #1 going for one and a half million. But there’s only one piece of art for that particular book. Back in those days, no one thought about keeping the art.

Grand opening calendar:

March 9, 11 a.m.: Ribbon cutting ceremony with Mayor Brainard and featured artist Donato Giancola; 7-9 p.m.: Opening reception with Giancola
March 10, 4-10 p.m.: Painting demonstration by Giancola

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