Monday, October 26, 2009

Mike Beas: Yankees will win in six

Posted By on Mon, Oct 26, 2009 at 4:00 AM

America's Team. The moniker, a 1970s-born tribute to the Dallas Cowboys, has since been scattered like fertilizer with other notable sports teams/franchises getting in on the act and later being sorry they did.

Remember Atlanta-based TBS, responsible for televising Braves baseball games, referring to its meal ticket as America's Team. It was snicker worthy then, and is roll-in-the-aisles hilarious now. Based on the team's four-year postseason dry spell and a fan base that shrinks yearly, I'm not sure Atlanta is even Georgia's Team. We'll give them Fulton County's Team and leave it at that.

The lesson being this: if bold enough to go stars and stripes on everybody, you best have the game, the staying power, to back it up.

Like them or not, the New York Yankees do. Historically and currently, they do. From The Babe to A-Rod, they do. Attempting to overlook 26 World Series championships, the first, in 1923, coming 48 years before the Dallas Cowboys captured the first of their five Super Bowls, is like trying to ignore Shaquille O'Neal in a telephone booth.

Starting Wednesday night, the Yankees slide head-first into their 40th World Series, this one against the Philadelphia Phillies, who, for a historical comparison, have been to seven. If New York disposes of Philly, which I predict it does in six games, it will mark the ninth time the Yanks have captured at least two World Series titles in a decade, the lone eyesore being the 1980s (zilch!).

New York opened the original Yankee Stadium with a championship and hope to christen the new one in the coming nights with sound, fundamental baseball capped off by other pinstriped memories such as a wild on-field celebration and the sound of champagne corks popping.

All in an October day's work for America's Team.

PARTING SHOT: Marcus Jordan, son of Michael and a 6-3 freshman guard at the University of Central Florida, is refusing to take the court wearing the adidas shoes the UCF program is contracted to wear. Apparently the power of the Swoosh can be felt as far away as Orlando.

Family loyalty is great and all, but Marcus now represents coach Kirk Speraw's program. He's a Golden Knight. Wears black and gold. In time will know the school's fight song, and so on.

Just because his old man's basketball brilliance elevated the Nike brand into orbit once upon a time doesn't mean Marcus should be taking advantage of the power of his surname. The kid is on scholarship. Central Florida is footing your educational bill, so step in line wearing the adidas shoes your teammates are wearing.

While at it, ask yourself the following question: "If my name was Marcus Smith and my old man was, say, a postal worker and not an iconic sports figure, would I even have a Division-I basketball scholarship?"

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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Mike Beas: Why the bye week?

Posted By on Tue, Oct 20, 2009 at 4:00 AM

Whichever numskull came up with the bye week in the National Football League should be located and then punished. Employment as Wade Phillips' personal masseuse for a month. Season tickets to Cleveland Browns games. You know, something harsh.

Bye weeks are the devil, especially when your team is flourishing the way the Indianapolis Colts are with a 5-0 record. Conversely, if your favorite franchise is stinking up the joint in ways even an open dumpster in August can't, bye weeks are a godsend. Can't lose if you don't play, right?

But the Colts have played and played well, so one wonders what kind of mental impact having Sunday off is going to have as the team moves forward beginning with next weekend's game in St. Louis against the pitiful Rams, a team responsible for zero victories and 54 points scored in its six outings.

Sure, Indianapolis players could wear their shoes on the wrong feet, start 49-year-old Mike Pagel at quarterback and probably still beat the Rams by two touchdowns. It's what comes after that that concerns me: three straight home games against good teams (San Francisco, Houston and New England), then consecutive road tests at Baltimore and Houston.

Chances are good the Colts will be favored in every one of those games, especially now that they are about to get hard-hitting safety Bob Sanders and cornerback Kelvin Hayden back on the field. But momentum tends to be unpredictable. So often it's there one minute, gone the next. This is the fight Indianapolis is about to find itself in.

The way it looks now, the Colts can only be defeated by, well, the Colts. Having five weeks worth of gaining speed impeded by a bye week is one such way. Here's hoping the players, coaches and management are too professional, too established in their ways, to let this occur.

KEEP CLAUSEN OUT OF HEISMAN CONVERSATION: College football, which seems to be as well-oiled a force as it's ever been, will take a large step back if Notre Dame quarterback Jimmy Clausen winds up clutching the Heisman Trophy the night of Dec. 12.

No question the kid is talented physically and is a gamer, but his body language following a tough loss like the one the Irish endured Saturday against USC is holding him back. The junior wet-noodled his way through a few handshakes and then headed off to the locker room like the 11-year-old boy he is while most of his teammates congratulated the Trojans players and coaches.

Also, I'm not sure Clausen is the best player on his team much less in all of college football. Receiver Golden Tate is pretty darned good, his talents making Clausen look that much better.

So who gets the Heisman? Still early, but at the moment Alabama tailback Mark Ingram is running away with it. Tim Tebow gets an invite to New York City as a finalist because he's Tim Tebow, and Texas quarterback Colt McCoy will be there, too. And probably Clausen because it's a way to further glamorize a mediocre Notre Dame program.

Just as long as he doesn't win.

?

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Venzago tells his side of the ISO story

Posted By on Tue, Oct 20, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

FAREWELL, DEAR FRIENDS

Mario Venzago, Music Director,

Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, 2002-2009:

Since the ISO announced the non-renewal of my Conductor and Music Director Agreements on July 30th of this year, I have, on the wise counsel of my advisors, refrained from making any formal statement and have not commented on the many things written in the newspapers — true or untrue regarding my departure as Conductor and Music Director of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra last July.

After so many weeks, however, further silence on my part would be unfair to my many friends in Indianapolis who have expressed in very touching words their concern and provided me their overwhelming support during these difficult weeks. For the moment, I wish to touch only on the main events surrounding my departure and will reserve any additional comment for those who request it.

On July 30th, I received without any warning or expectation a short e-mail from Simon Crookall, President and CEO of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, informing me that my Conductor and Music Director Agreements would not be renewed for the 2009/10 season. These agreements were set to expire just 31 days later on August 31st and have indeed now since expired. Mr. Crookall and my agent had been negotiating the renewal of these Agreements since the Fall of 2008.

Termination on such short notice is unprecedented in the world of classical music. Just six weeks prior to the start of the season and with contract negotiations still in progress, I was abruptly told that my Agreements would not be renewed, but that I would be offered the opportunity to conduct a "farewell week". In the view of Mr. Crookall, this would be a fitting celebration of my seven years of artistic success as conductor and music director of the ISO.

For me, as you can well imagine, this news was emotionally devastating. Only one week before, Mr. Crookall embraced me at the Musical Arts Center at Indiana University in recognition of my artistic achievement. The ISO administration and I had been planning the 2009/10 season for more than two years. I had blocked the dates and turned down numerous conducting offers from other orchestras. The dates of the concerts were set and the programs planned. We contracted soloists, calculated costs, prepared PR materials, printed a brochure and started to sell tickets. No reputable orchestra mindful of the costs would make changes at this critical point, unless money was of no concern. I relied during these negotiations on the good faith of Mr. Crookall and the Board and expected to be treated fairly.

After the announcement of the non-renewal, I have received hundreds of letters from ISO musicians, members of other orchestras, concert-goers, composers, people from Indianapolis and other places. They have confided in me how shocked they were upon learning of my departure and how much they loved and respected my work. In particular, the musicians described in touching, heart-felt words how much they loved performing with me. I have not been able to answer all of their wonderful expressions of concern and appreciation and I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has written and spoken with me.

In conclusion, let me express the hope that the donors, sponsors and subscribers will continue to support the ISO despite this unfortunate event. Even if I am hurt and disappointed, my soul is not broken. I will never stop loving this great orchestra in Indianapolis with its sensitive, enthusiastic musicians who gave of themselves so freely, and I will always be deeply moved remembering my Indianapolis friends in this warm-hearted and peaceful community. Here and there, if only for a fleeting moment, we were privileged to have touched the stars. I thank you all from the bottom of my heart and wish the ISO all the best in the future.

Mario Venzago

October 2009

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Monday, October 19, 2009

New sculpture at Children's Museum

Posted By on Mon, Oct 19, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

FILMMAKER'S SCULPTURE CARRIES RECYCLING MESSAGE, SEEKS TO FUND NEW DOCUMENTARY

INDIANAPOLIS — Wolflab Productions owner Dan Hottle has entered into an agreement with The Children's Museum of Indianapolis and the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Foundation to display Hottle's sculpture, "Digital Storyteller" in the InfoZone, the branch library within the museum, for a period of one year to create awareness of electronics recycling and to help raise funds for a new documentary film.

The three-foot sculpture, made of hundreds of recycled computer electronics components donated by the Virtual Scavengers electronics recycling nonprofit organization here, portrays the growing impact emerging digital technologies have on contemporary storytelling and illustrates the importance of eliminating dangerous electronic waste from our nation's landfills.

Hottle is seeking sale of the sculpture to keep the work at the museum permanently and to help raise additional funds for his full-length documentary film, "Dreaming as One." Shot entirely on location in the rainforests of Queensland , Australia , the film depicts the struggles faced by the country's indigenous populations to preserve their 40,000-year-old cultural heritage. The film outlines how emerging digital technologies have both helped and hindered the way indigenous people worldwide gain control over the preservation of centuries-old intellectual property. Although principal photography has been completed, Hottle is seeking additional funds to return to the region to complete a pivotal update on one of the main subjects in the film, which was shot in June 2008.

Hottle, who gained national attention in 2001 as a U.S. Marine Corps combat correspondent, served as the Marines' spokesperson in Afghanistan immediately following the events of Sept. 11, 2001. He said the sculpture is already generating a great deal of interest from museum patrons and that he hopes to create future public educational presentations surrounding the sculpture's vital message.

"It is my goal that an individual or organization will see the timely and relevant value in both the sculpture and the film and support this effort through the sponsorship of the sculpture," Hottle said. "That way it can remain in the Children's Museum for future generations to learn from and enjoy."

For more information, contact Dan Hottle at (317) 525-7885 or wolflab1968@yahoo.com

Wolflab Productions is a full-service video production company located in Indianapolis that specializes in corporate and private documentary productions.

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Ad agency/Nonprofit marathon Thursday

Posted By on Mon, Oct 19, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

Local Creative Firms and Nonprofits Pair Up for Creative Marathon

INDIANAPOLIS - Top creative and account management teams from four of the best communication companies in Indianapolis will develop new creative campaigns on behalf of four deserving nonprofits during the first annual 24 Hours of Pro Bono creative marathon.

Designed to elevate the profile of creative agencies in Indianapolis while showcasing the amazing causes of central Indiana nonprofit organizations, 24 Hours of Pro Bono will put four AAF — Indianapolis firms to the test by challenging them to cultivate a creative concept in 24 hours.

The event will begin on Wednesday, Oct. 21 with a luncheon at the Indianapolis Central Library, where four nonprofit organizations will be revealed and randomly paired with four AAF — Indianapolis member firms. Following the luncheon, each firm will commit its time and talent for the next 24 hours to develop a creative concept on behalf of its selected nonprofit. The firms will present their creative materials in the auditorium of the Central Library at 6 p.m. on Oct. 22. Participating member firms are Caldwell VanRiper, Hirons & Company, Publicis and Westlake Design.

"Many worthy nonprofit organizations desperately need professional communications assistance to compete for local dollars to fulfill their missions," said Tom Hirons, president of AAF Indianapolis. "AAF creative firms will assist these underserved and budget-challenged nonprofit organizations to more effectively increase awareness and communication."

The cost to attend the presentations and the cocktail reception is $10 for AAF members and $35 for nonmembers. Members of the news media are invited to watch the agencies in action on Wednesday and Thursday, and are welcome to attend the presentations free of charge.

To RSVP please e-mail Amanda Massey at AmandaMassey@clearchannel.com or to learn more or pay in advance, please visit www.24hoursofprobono.com.

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Alice Friman returns to Gathering of Writers

Posted By on Mon, Oct 19, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

Thirty years ago, a small, dedicated group of Indianapolis writers came together to found the Writers' Center of Indiana. Since then, Alice Friman, one of those writers, has racked up publications and awards that would make any poet proud. With her fifth book of poems on the way, Friman is a force in American poetry. It's our privilege to bring her back to Indianapolis as the keynote of this year's Gathering of Writers and Readers.

Alice Friman's new book of poems, Vinculum, is forthcoming from LSU Press in 2011. She is the author of eight collections of poetry, most recently The Book of the Rotten Daughter from BkMk Press released in April 2006, and Zoo (Arkansas, 1999), winner of the Ezra Pound Poetry Award from Truman State University and the Sheila Margaret Motton Prize from the New England Poetry Club. Her poems appear in Poetry, The Georgia Review, Boulevard, The Southern Review, The Gettysburg Review, and Shenandoah, which awarded Friman the James Boatwright III Prize for Poetry, Shenandoah, 2001.

She's received fellowships from the Indiana Arts Commission and the Arts Council of Indianapolis and has been awarded residencies at many colonies including MacDowell and Yaddo. She was named Writer in Residence at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest in 2003-04. Friman is the winner of three prizes from Poetry Society of America and in 2001-02 was named to the Georgia Poetry Circuit. Professor Emerita at the University of Indianapolis, she now lives in Milledgeville, GA where she is Poet-in-Residence at Georgia College & State University.

Join Alice Friman and Indiana's best writers and editors on Saturday, November 7 at the Indianapolis Art Center.

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2009 One Book, One City pick

Posted By on Mon, Oct 19, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

Indy's Choice for 2009 One Book, One City:

"Some Buried Caesar" by Rex Stout!

The Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library and the Office of Mayor Greg Ballard invite the entire community to uncover a classic mystery by Indiana native Rex Stout during the 2009 One Book, One City reading initiative.

Some Buried Caesar, Stout's 1939 novel featuring the larger-than-life fictional detective Nero Wolfe, has been chosen for the program that continues through November 30. The announcement came during the Indiana Mystery Authors Celebration at Central Library on October 16 in support of the Bouchercon World Mystery Convention in Indianapolis.

Readers will find the eccentric Wolfe and his assistant Archie Goodwin stranded in a private pasture in upstate New York following an automobile breakdown. The two are thrust into a family feud over the fate of a prize bull named Caesar (stud farm or steak house?) while they endure poor food, uncomfortable chairs, warm beer . . . and three dead bodies. The great detective is on the horns of a dilemma as the stampede of suspects conceals a special breed of killer who wins a blue ribbon for sheer audacity.

Rex Stout was born in Noblesville, Indiana in 1886 and became known as America's best crime writer. His character Nero Wolfe debuted in 1934 with Fer-de-Lance and retired in his 1975 work, A Family Affair.

Over 500 copies of Some Buried Caesar are available for borrowing at the library, in addition to numerous audio and downloadable copies. Upon checkout, patrons will receive a "Read It and Rate It" comment card that can be filled out and returned with the book. Like a bookmark, the card will stay with the book when it is re-shelved with comments that other borrowers will find informative and fun. When returning the comment cards, patrons will be entered at their local branch to win a $25 Kroger gift card and custom-designed One Book, One City book bag.

Several options will be available to keep discussion of the book going. Patrons can share their comments on the Library's One Book, One City website (www.imcpl.org/onebook), where they will find information about the book, fun questions to stimulate discussion, and a downloadable discussion guide. The site will also feature blogs and social networking opportunities. In addition, selected IMCPL branches will host free discussion programs on the title.

The One Book, One City initiative began in 2003 with The Friendly Persuasion by Jessamyn West, which was followed by Endurance by Alfred Lansing, The Bondwoman's Narrative by Hannah Craft (edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.), Catch Me If You Can by Frank Abagnale, Jr., and Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

One Book, One City is made possible with proceeds from the Eugene & Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award, a program of the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Foundation.

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Sunday, October 18, 2009

Ring of Honor Returns to Indy

Posted By on Sun, Oct 18, 2009 at 4:00 AM

A look at some of the articles that I've written for NUVO (or its website) will tell you that I'm a fan of professional wrestling. Yes, I know it's not really a sport. But I'd rather watch pro wrestling than a "reality" TV show or an F1 race (aka "Follow the Leader").

I had planned on checking out the Ring of Honor show that was held in the Farm Bureau Building at the Indiana State Fairgrounds on October 10th, but did not make it. A friend of mine Kevin Buerge, another fan of pro wrestling, went to the ROH show and wrote the following article.

Two nights before World Wrestling Entertainment brought their weekly episodic Monday Night Raw to Conseco Fieldhouse, Ring of Honor Wrestling, a national, independent wrestling organization, held their second-ever show in Indianapolis at the Farm Bureau Building at the Indiana State Fairgrounds.

ROH, as it is also known, was founded in 2002 and is headquartered in the Philadelphia suburb of Bristol, Pennsylvania. The organization has been recognized in the past as one of the top wrestling promotions in the United States and featuring some of the top wrestlers in the country by The Wrestling Observer Newsletter. Eschewing the glitz, glamour, pyro and jumbo display screen that are common at WWE shows, ROH concentrates and prides itself on excelling at pure wrestling action. The promotion records the majority of its shows and sells them on DVD.

Former Ring of Honor wrestlers include: two-time WWE World Heavyweight Champion C.M. Punk and Total Nonstop Action stars Samoa Joe and A.J. Styles. ROH is very well known and highly regarded on the independent wrestling scene. Pro wrestling legends Ric Flair, Ricky Steamboat and Mick Foley have also made appearances in the promotion.

The theme of Saturday's show was the promotion's annual Survival of the Fittest match where wrestlers competed in qualifying matches with the winners competing in a six-man elimination match for the main event. The evening also featured an appearance by professional wrestling legend Jim Cornette, a regular personality with the promotion.

All of the wrestlers worked hard throughout the evening, determined to give the fans a show. At the end of the main event, Tyler Black and Roderick Strong also had the crowd of nearly 400 on their feet chanting and yelling as they put on a superb finale to the final bout. The two had superb back and forth action with numerous near falls that had the fans roaring in appreciation.

The tag team match between Jay and Mark Briscoe and Austin Aries (current ROH World Heavyweight Champion) and Davey Richards (one-half of the current ROH World Tag Team Champions) was also a highlight as it perfectly told a story of a match with a team with a lot of dissention (Aries and Richards) competing against another duo. The Briscoe Brothers are one of the best tag teams on the independent circuit, having been selected as Tag Team of the Year by The Wrestling Observer Newsletter in 2007 and winning tag team championships in numerous promotions in which they competed.

Black ended the show profusely thanking the fans for their support and adding that he, Strong and the other wrestlers put on the matches that they do because of them.

Cornette might have said it best when he addressed the audience at the beginning of the show when he said "Ring of Honor wants to give the fans what they want, professional wrestling."

Ring of Honor airs nationally every Monday night on HDNet at 8 and 11 p.m. EST. ROH can also be found on the web at www.rohwrestling.com and http://www.hd.net/ringofhonor.html.

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Thursday, October 15, 2009

Rita Kohn play coming to WFYI

Posted By on Thu, Oct 15, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

WFYI Public Television Presents Wind Chimes and Promises

Broadcast Offers Stage Adaptation of Local Author's Memoir

Wind Chimes and Promises is a moving stage adaptation of a memoir written by Indianapolis author Phyllis Adair-Ward. Filmed on location at the Indiana State Museum, this one-act play developed by Hoosier playwright Rita Kohn, captures the poignant story of Adair-Ward's mother, Prudence, and her coming of age in Indianapolis' Martindale-Brightwood neighborhood in the first part of the nineteenth century. The production, which stars Indianapolis actress Stevi Butler, will mark its broadcast premiere Thursday, October 22 at 8:00 pm on WFYI 3 (20.3 DT).

The dramatization of Wind Chimes and Promises begins in 1919, when Prudence's family is forced to flee its farm in Homer, Georgia, and relocate to Indianapolis in search of a better life. The play depicts Prudence during her formative years (from 9 to 16 years of age), when she is both homesick for the Georgia town that she no longer can return to, and distraught over the unwelcome reception she receives from the Indianapolis community she must now learn to call home.

'We experience with Prudence, her coming of age in a place she has not felt fully comfortable until 'the turning point' - the point at which she recognizes that the real challenge of life is to make of yourself a good person no matter where you live," said Indianapolis playwright Rita Kohn, who adapted the story for stage.

With the help of her parents, Prudence is able to mature into a young woman who not only learns the importance of self-respect, but the need to accept and regard the values of others as well. As public television viewers will soon discover, Wind Chimes and Promises is really a story within a story. The play not only chronicles one young girl's journey into adolescence, but offers a fascinating historical account of an Indianapolis community from post World War I through the eve of the Great Depression.

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Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Children's Theatre Institute launches new show

Posted By on Tue, Oct 13, 2009 at 4:00 AM

This just in...

Children's Theatre Institute to present "Vaudeville's My Home"

Big-city swindlers meet local yokels in Northside youth troupe's musical

INDIANAPOLIS (Oct. 13, 2009) — A pair of slick vaudeville veterans on the lam run into hilarious complications when they try to swindle a group of local yokels in the Children's Theatre Institute production of "Vaudeville's My Home."

The musical will be performed Nov. 20, 21 and 22 at the Children's Theatre Institute's state-of-the-art 300-seat theatre inside the Gene B. Glick Junior Achievement Education and Conference Center on the north side. Under the direction of Artistic Director James Leagre, The Children's Theatre Institute educates and inspires young people through theatre arts.

Set in the 1920s, "Vaudeville's My Home" features two vaudeville troupers who are fleeing New York following their robbery of a theatre box office. They become stranded in the village of Pleasant Corners, Ohio. Broke and hungry, they devise a plan to swindle the locals by convincing them they have enough talent to produce their own vaudeville show to raise money for a new school. The play try-outs are hilarious: Eloise Findley, the rich spinster, recites "The Bells;" the hillbilly McDowell clan give their deadpan rendition of "Little Brown Jug;" and the N.A.G.S. (National Alliance for Good Schools) forms a chorus line.

Fifteen Indianapolis-area middle and elementary school students will perform in the show. The cast includes several students from Carmel schools: Sam Leagre, 9, Mohawk Trails Elementary; Summer Snyder, 9, Forest Dale Elementary, Isabel Ruiz, 10, Mohawk Trails Elementary; Macy Berglund, 8, Towne Meadow Elementary; Arianna Davis, 10, Brookview Elementary; Kristen LaCosse, 11, Winding Ridge Elementary; Julia Hyman, 11, Clay Middle School; Bobby White, 13, Carmel Middle School; and Tim Pawlovich, 12, Clay Middle School.

Additional cast members are: Samantha Russell, 11, Mt. Vernon Intermediate; Ian Thomas, 11, Eastwood Middle; Emma Kinghorrn, 11, St. Pius X; Samantha Thomas, 11, homeschool; Cormac Doebbeling, 11, St. Pius X; and Brandon Burk, 10, Geist Elementary.

The production will be directed by Leagre, founder and executive director of The Children's Theatre Institute, and Megan Johnson, theatre student at Butler University. Trish Mentink, music teacher at Cathedral High School and a regular in local music and theatre circles, is music director.

About The Children's Theatre Institute

The Children's Theatre Institute was founded by James Leagre. Its roots began in Chicago in 1991 as Chicago TheatreWorks, a touring theatre company comprised of professional actors performing for children. Six years later, Leagre moved to Indianapolis and began The Children's Theatre Institute.

About Artistic Director James Leagre

A native Hoosier, Leagre began studying theater as an 11-year-old at Indiana Repertory Theatre. As a young actor, he performed with Civic Theatre, Footlite Musicals and Nettle Creek Players, as well as in commercials. As a high school student, Leagre co-founded the Hamilton County Youth Theatre, comprised entirely of students, which produced summer plays for five seasons(one of which was "Vaudeville's My Home" in which he played Emmanuel Thorndike Hooker). He went on to Ohio Northern University, where he earned a B.S. in Theatre and Public Relations in 1986. Awarded an internship with the renowned Actors Theatre of Louisville, Leagre followed that experience by going to Los Angeles where he earned his M.F.A. in Acting from UCLA and received the prestigious Jack Nicholson Acting Award. Upon settling in Chicago in 1991, Leagre founded Chicago TheatreWorks, which brought the arts to more than 300,000 children over six years. He also volunteered in Chicago public school arts outreach programs and acted in professional theatre and commercials. In 1997, Leagre relocated to Indianapolis and began plans for a major expansion of TheatreWorks' mission, resulting in the Children's Theatre Institute. Since returning to Indianapolis, he has appeared in numerous productions at the Indiana Repertory Theatre and performed with the Beckman Theatre, Edyvean Rep, Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and a variety of independent films as well as local and national commercials. In addition, he has been an adjunct instructor for Butler University's Theatre Department, Marian University and a variety of high schools and junior high schools throughout the area. He and his wife and children live in Carmel.

WHAT: "Vaudeville's My Home"

WHEN: Friday, Nov. 20 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Nov. 22 at 2 p.m.

WHERE: Children's Theatre Institute at Junior Achievement, 7435 N. Keystone Ave.

COST: $5 per person; kids 4 and under free

INFO: www.indycti.org or 317-251-5100 ext. 503

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Mike Beas: Paterno and Bowden, time to go?

Posted By on Tue, Oct 13, 2009 at 4:00 AM

Penn State hosts Minnesota in college football on Saturday, a matchup in which the winner earns no less than an additional seven-day stay near the top of the Big Ten standings with the likes of league unbeatens Ohio State and Iowa.

And no one will care. Why? Because Joe Paterno is old.

Florida State doesn't play this weekend. In fact, the Seminoles are off until their October 22 date at North Carolina, one of those made-for-TV Thursday nighters that is going to either give FSU its first Atlantic Coast Conference victory of the season or drop it to 0-4 in the standings.

And no one will care. Why? Because Bobby Bowden is old.

Unless, of course, you stand him next to Paterno. JoePa turns 83 in December, while Bowden, a young whippersnapper by comparison, won't even hit the Big 8-oh until Nov. 8. They are iconic figures in the sport, Paterno and Bowden, the kind of men that inspire funding, blueprinting and eventual construction of stadium statues.

But until they retire to the old coach's home, the one an increasing number of fans seem in a hurry to push them towards, their decades of good will continue to take a hit. That's not me talking. That's just the way it is. How our society works. Younger is better even when it isn't.

Penn State is 5-1 and ranked 14th nationally, so things are relatively quiet at the moment in Paternoville. Not the case in Tallahassee with Florida State having already lost four games by a total of 26 points. For the time being, FSU is entirely void of the national relevance it once enjoyed. Days when five-star high school studs from all over the country couldn't wait to put on the arrow-decaled gold helmet for the first time.

Bowden is being blamed. Same would be true if Penn State was struggling. What critics fail to recognize is that these programs wouldn't be maintaining such incredibly high football standards if not for Paterno and Bowden, the ones responsible for getting PSU and FSU to this level in the first place.

At this point in their respective careers, Paterno and Bowden are basically figureheads. Men who are the lined and weathered faces of their programs while the real work goes on behind them on the sideline and up in the coach's booth in the form of headset-wearing assistant coaches.

But they are figureheads with a purpose. Think about it, if Paterno and Bowden are fired tomorrow, who is the next coach in college football that still will be leading his team onto the field in his late-70s or 80s? He doesn't exist. JoePa and Bobby are the last of a dying (sorry!) breed, so if anything we should be looking to keep them around longer.

Frankly, it's time for people to quit questioning the two winningest coaches in the history of college football. Why? Because it's old.

?

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Monday, October 12, 2009

(Sports) Younger is better, even when it isn't

Posted By on Mon, Oct 12, 2009 at 4:00 AM

Penn State hosts Minnesota in college football on Saturday, a matchup in which the winner earns no less than an additional seven-day stay near the top of the Big Ten standings with the likes of league unbeatens Ohio State and Iowa.

And no one will care. Why? Because Joe Paterno is old.

Florida State doesn't play this weekend. In fact, the Seminoles are off until their October 22 date at North Carolina, one of those made-for-TV Thursday nighters that is going to either give FSU its first Atlantic Coast Conference victory of the season or drop it to 0-4 in the standings.

And no one will care. Why? Because Bobby Bowden is old.

Unless, of course, you stand him next to Paterno. JoePa turns 83 in December, while Bowden, a young whippersnapper by comparison, won't even hit the Big 8-oh until November 8. They are iconic figures in the sport, Paterno and Bowden, the kind of men that inspire funding, blueprinting and eventual construction of stadium statues.

But until they retire to the old coach's home, the one an increasing number of fans seem in a hurry to push them towards, their decades of good will continue to take a hit. That's not me talking. That's just the way it is. How our society works. Younger is better even when it isn't.

Penn State is 5-1 and ranked 14th nationally, so things are relatively quiet at the moment in Paternoville. Not the case in Tallahassee with Florida State having already lost four games by a total of 26 points. For the time being, FSU is entirely void of the national relevance it once enjoyed. Days when five-star high school studs from all over the country couldn't wait to put on the arrow-decaled gold helmet for the first time.

Bowden is being blamed. Same would be true if Penn State was struggling. What critics fail to recognize is that these programs wouldn't be maintaining such incredibly high football standards if not for Paterno and Bowden, the ones responsible for getting PSU and FSU to this level in the first place.

At this point in their respective careers, Paterno and Bowden are basically figureheads. Men who are the lined and weathered faces of their programs while the real work goes on behind them on the sideline and up in the coach's booth in the form of headset-wearing assistant coaches.

But they are figureheads with a purpose. Think about it, if Paterno and Bowden are fired tomorrow, who is the next coach in college football that still will be leading his team onto the field in his late-70s or 80s? He doesn't exist. JoePa and Bobby are the last of a dying (sorry!) breed, so if anything we should be looking to keep them around longer.

Frankly, it's time for people to quit questioning the two winningest coaches in the history of college football. Why? Because it's old.

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